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Teaching and learning activity attachments

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Attachment 3.1 – Indigenous nations before colonisation

Some of the groups are very small and some are very large. Why do you think this might be?
Name five of the smallest nations:
Name five of the largest nations:
Compass rose
Compass rose
Using the compass on the right, answer these questions:
Which nation is the first north of the Kamilaroi?
Which nation lived to the south west of the Dharug people?
In which direction did the Ngunawal people live from the Wiradjuri people?
Which direction would I have to travel to move from Biripi country to Gumbainggir country?
Which Aboriginal cultural or language nation would you be most interested in finding out more about and why?

Attachment 4.1 – The Land owns us

I own my Land

My Land owns me

Attachment 5.1 – Uluru

Uluru - black and white line drawing
Uluru
What makes Uluru a sacred place?
Uluru mark by Outstandy is licensed under CC0 1.0

Attachment 5.2 – More about Uluru

Who are the traditional custodians of Uluru?
How big is Uluru?
How did Uluru come to be here?
How do Dreaming stories explain Uluru?

There are lots of different people who value Uluru for different reasons. Three of those are traditional owners, tourists and local business operators.

What are the needs or wants of each group? How do they treat Uluru differently?

Traditional owners
Tourists
Businesses

Attachment 6.1 – Aboriginal dance

Throughout time, dance has been a core part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Dance has played a big part in sharing Dreaming stories and teaching lessons from generation to generation.

Each group has different customs, traditions, songs and ways of using dance.

Sometimes dance was used to help people move between different stages of their life. As boys and girls grew up, they were taught different dances to celebrate this ‘rite of passage’. Dance was also used for special celebrations such as weddings and funerals.

One of the major purposes of dance was to share stories across the generations. It was quite common to imitate animals in traditional dances which helped to bring life to the Dreaming stories.

There were other elements that helped to bring the dances to life. Usually, instruments like clapping sticks and didgeridoos were used. Body and face paint were also used to help convey meaning.

Attachment 6.2 – Brolgas

What do you think a brolga is?
What is an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander word for brolga?
Draw a brolga in the box:
Which other birds have long legs like a brolga?
What sort of environment does a brolga live in?
How do the features of the brolga suit its environment?
What does the brolga’s nest look like?
Attachment 6.2 – Brolgas. Some of this content has been reproduced and communicated from Brolga – Bangarra Dance Theatre Education Resource, Before Viewing, Things to think about – For Years 3/4, accessed 13 September 2019, in accordance with the following copyright notice: © 2013 Bangarra Dance Theatre Australia and Education Services Australia Ltd, unless otherwise indicated. Provided all acknowledgements are retained, this material may be used, reproduced and communicated free of charge for non-commercial educational purposes within Australia and in overseas schools where the Australian curriculum is taught.

Attachment 6.3 – Brolga dance

Do the dancers look anything like the real brolgas? How?
Do the dancers move like real brolgas? How?
What shape do the five dancers make around the girl?
Why is the big group of dancers facing the same direction?
What do you think the dancers’ arms represent when they are long? What about when they are bent at the elbows?
Why are the stage lights blue?
Why do you think there is a lot of dust on the stage? What does it represent?
Attachment 6.3 – Brolga dance. Some of this content has been reproduced and communicated from Brolga – Bangarra Dance Theatre Education Resource, After Viewing, For Years 3/4, accessed 13 September 2019, in accordance with the following copyright notice: © 2013 Bangarra Dance Theatre Australia and Education Services Australia Ltd, unless otherwise indicated. Provided all acknowledgements are retained, this material may be used, reproduced and communicated free of charge for non-commercial educational purposes within Australia and in overseas schools where the Australian curriculum is taught.

Attachment 8.1 – Art lesson with Kamilaroi artist Reko Rennie

This activity was developed by the AGNSW in conversation with Kamilaroi artist Reko Rennie for a virtual art lesson.

Materials: vibrantly coloured kindergarten squares (minimum 4 per student), scissors, glue sticks, pencils, acrylic paint, small paintbrushes

  1. Students select two vibrantly coloured kindergarten squares. Once selected, students fold one square in half, either diagonally or horizontally. Inform students that this colour will be the top layer.
  2. Using scissors, students cut out a series of geometric and organic shapes. Inform students that the more they cut out, the more the bottom colour will be exposed.
  3. After cutting out shapes, students unfold the square to reveal a pattern. Carefully, students glue the patterned square to the bottom square. Some sections may be particularly delicate, and students may require assistance.
    Pink square
    Orange square
    Pink square cut with geometric patterns on top of an orange square
  4. Students are asked to develop an icon that represents themselves, a memory or close relative. They may experiment with pencil on paper. These may vary from icons such as initials, numbers, objects, emojis, and so on. Inform students this icon will be painted over the surface of the squares.
  5. Once students have developed an icon, they select a contrasting colour acrylic paint.
    Pink square cut with geometric patterns on top of an orange square with single icon painted in black on top.
    Pink square with diagonally symmetrical orange pattern with single black icon
  6. Using a thin or thick brush, students paint their icon over the top of the squares. They may choose to produce a repeated pattern with smaller icons or singular large icon.
  7. As students begin to finish, ask them to start placing their artworks alongside those of the other students until a large collaborative assemblage is created. Students will need to make choices and have discussions about placement and relationships between specific artworks to create the most effective larger-scale collaborative installation with their peers.
No sleep till Dreamtime, 2014 artwork by Reko Rennie. Birch plywood, metallic textile foil, synthetic polymer, diamond dust, gold leaf.
No sleep till Dreamtime, Reko Rennie, 2014, detail: birch plywood, metallic textile foil, synthetic polymer, diamond dust, gold leaf.
Reko Rennie standing in front of a painting in his studio
Reko Rennie in his studio, photo: Emily Weaving

Attachment 8.1 – Art lesson with Kamilaroi artist Reko Rennie. Except as identified below, this content has been reproduced and communicated with permission from the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

No sleep till Dreamtime, © Reko Rennie, 2014, copied under s113P, accessed 13 September 2019

Reko Rennie in his studio, photographer: Emily Weaving, copied under s113P, accessed 13 September 2019

Attachment 9.1 – Cook’s secret mission

Captain James Cook was on a scientific mission to chart the transit of Venus, but he was also given secret instructions for a second mission.

Cook was to try to find the ‘great southern land’ while he was in the area. If he found it, there were certain things that he was asked to do:

  • Draw maps of its coastline.
  • Make friends with any people living in the land and find out information about them.
  • Establish a trading post for Britain in Australia with the consent of the people living in the land.
  • If the land was uninhabited, he was to claim it for Britain.

After sailing up the east coast of Australia, Cook planted a British flag on Possession Island in what is now Queensland and claimed the whole east coast for Britain.

Captain Cook had seen lots of Aboriginal people when he was sailing up the coast of Australia. He knew that there were people living there, but he did not see any houses or fences and so he believed that the land was free to claim for Britain.

He wrote that the land was ‘terra nullius’. This Latin phrase means ‘land belonging to no one’. Because Captain Cook couldn’t see that the Aboriginal peoples ‘owned’ the land, he said it was free for Britain to take. Because of this, the British never signed a treaty or agreement with the Aboriginal peoples – they just took control of the country.

Cook claiming that Australia was ‘terra nullius’ was very important in what happened next. Was he right to call it that? How might things have been different if he didn’t?

Attachment 9.1 – Cook’s secret mission, source: Terra Nullius, Treaty Republic, author: Kevin Butler, 1995, copied under s113P, accessed 13 September 2019

Attachment 19.1 – The apology

Why did the former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd say sorry?
Was he personally responsible for doing these things?
Why would people now say sorry for what happened?
Do you believe it is important to continue to say sorry for what happened?
Who do you believe should say sorry on Sorry Day?

Attachment 19.2 – Indigenous flags

Australian Aboriginal flag - black and white line drawing

Australian Aboriginal flag

Torres Strait Islander flag - black and white line drawing

Torres Strait Islander flag

Australian Aboriginal flag, designer: Mr Harold Thomas, © Mr Harold Thomas, copied under s113P, accessed 13 September 2019

Torres Strait Islander flag, designer: Mr Bernard Namok, © Torres Strait Island Regional Council, copied under s113P, accessed 13 September 2019

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