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>> Back to SpecEd 2019 – K6 – The Wizard of Oz

Syllabus outcomes for this unit

Select the key learning area to show the list of outcomes.

English

Early Stage 1

ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.

ENe-2A: Composes simple texts to convey an idea or message.

ENe-3A: Produces most lower case and upper case letters and uses digital technologies to construct texts.

ENe-4A: Demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies.

ENe-9B: Demonstrates developing skills and knowledge in grammar, punctuation and vocabulary when responding to and composing texts.

ENe-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts.

ENe-11D: Responds to and composes simple texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences.

Stage 1

EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.

EN1-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers.

EN1-3A: Composes texts using letters of consistent size and slope and uses digital technologies.

EN1-4A: Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies.

EN1-9B: Uses basic grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary appropriate to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.

EN1-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

EN1-11D: Responds to and composes a range of texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences.

Stage 2

EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.

EN2-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a range of texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and language.

EN2-3A: Uses effective handwriting and publishes texts using digital technologies.

EN2-4A: Uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies.

EN2-9B: Uses effective and accurate sentence structure, grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary relevant to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.

EN2-10C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

EN2-11D: Responds to and composes a range of texts that express viewpoints of the world similar to and different from their own.

Stage 3

EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.

EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.

EN3-3A: Uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies.

EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies.

EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.

EN3-8D: Identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world, including aspects of culture, are represented in texts.

Mathematics

Early Stage 1

MAe-1WM: Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.

MAe-2WM: Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.

MAe-9MG: Describes and compares lengths and distances using everyday language.

MAe-10MG: Describes and compares areas using everyday language.

MAe-13MG: Sequences events, uses everyday language to describe the durations of events, and reads hour time on clocks.

MAe-15MG: Manipulates and sorts and describes representations of two-dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, squares and rectangles, using everyday language.

MAe-16MG: Describes position and gives and follows simple directions using everyday language.

MAe-17SP: Represents data and interprets data displays made from objects.

Stage 1

MA1-1WM: Describes mathematical situations and methods using everyday and some mathematical language, actions materials, diagrams and symbols.

MA1-2WM: Uses objects, diagrams and technology to explore mathematical problems.

MA1-4NA: Applies place value, informally, to count, order, read and represent two and three digit numbers.

MA1-9MG: Measures, records, compares and estimates lengths and distances using uniform informal units, metres and centimetres.

MA1-10MG: Measures, records, compares and estimates areas using uniform informal units.

MA1-15MG: Manipulates, sorts, represents, describes and explores two-dimensional shapes, including quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons and octagons.

MA1-16MG: Represents and describes the positions of objects in everyday situations and on maps.

MA1-17SP: Gathers and organises data, displays data in lists, tables and picture graphs and interprets the results.

Stage 2

MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent, mathematical ideas.

MA2-2WM: Selects and uses appropriate mental or written strategies, or technology, to solve problems.

MA2-4NA: Applies place value to order, read and represent numbers of up to five digits.

MA2-5NA: Uses mental and written strategies for addition and subtraction involving two, three, four and five digit numbers.

MA2-9MG: Measures, records, compares and estimates lengths, distances and perimeters in metres, centimetres and millimetres.

MA2-10MG: Measures, records, compares and estimates areas using square centimetres and square metres.

MA2-15MG: Manipulates, identifies and sketches two-dimensional shapes, including special quadrilaterals, and describes their features.

MA2-17MG: Uses simple maps and grids to represent position and follow routes, including using compass directions.

MA2-18SP: Selects appropriate methods to collect data and constructs, compares, interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column graphs.

Stage 3

MA3-1WM: Describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some conventions.

MA3-2WM: Selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies, including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking investigations.

MA3-4NA: Orders, reads and represents integers of any size and describes properties of whole numbers.

MA3-5NA: Selects and applies appropriate strategies for addition and subtraction with counting numbers of any size.

MA3-9MG: Selects and uses the appropriate unit and device to measure lengths and distances, calculates perimeter and converts between units of length.

MA3-10MG: Selects and uses the appropriate unit to calculate areas, including areas of squares, rectangles and triangles.

MA3-16MG: Measures and constructs angles, and applies angle relationships to find unknown angles.

MA3-18SP: Uses appropriate methods to collect data and constructs, interprets and evaluates data displays, including dot plots, line graphs and two-way tables.

Creative arts

Early Stage 1 – Dance

DAES1.2: Explores movement in response to a stimulus to express ideas, feelings or moods.

Early Stage 1 – Drama

DRAES1.1: Uses imagination and the elements of drama in imaginative play and dramatic situations.

DRAES1.4: Responds to dramatic experiences.

Early Stage 1 – Music

MUES1.1: Participates in simple speech, singing, playing and moving activities, demonstrating an awareness of musical concepts.

MUES1.2: Creates own rhymes, games, songs and simple compositions.

MUES1.4: Listens to and responds to music.

Early Stage 1 – Visual arts

VAES1.1: Makes simple pictures and other kinds of artworks about things and experiences.

VAES1.2: Experiments with a range of media in selected forms.

VAES1.4: Communicates their ideas about pictures and other kinds of artworks.

Stage 1 – Dance

DAS1.2: Explores and selects movement using the elements of dance to make dance express ideas, feelings or moods.

Stage 1 – Drama

DRAS1.1: Takes on roles in drama to explore familiar and imagined situations.

DRAS1.2: Conveys story, depicts events and expresses feelings by using the elements of drama and the expressive skills of movement and voice.

DRAS1.4: Appreciates dramatic work during the making of their own drama and the drama of others.

Stage 1 – Music

MUS1.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, demonstrating an awareness of musical concepts.

MUS1.2: Explores, creates, selects and organises sound in simple structures.

MUS1.4: Responds to a range of music, expressing likes and dislikes and the reasons for these choices.

Stage 1 – Visual arts

VAS 1.1: Makes artworks in a particular way about experiences of real and imaginary things.

VAS1.2: Uses the forms to make artworks according to varying requirements.

VAS1.4: Begins to interpret the meaning of artworks, acknowledging the roles of artist and audience.

Stage 2 – Dance

DAS2.2: Explores, selects and combines movement using the elements of dance to communicate ideas, feelings or moods.

Stage 2 – Drama

DRAS2.1: Takes on and sustains roles in a variety of drama forms to express meaning in a wide range of imagined situations.

DRAS2.2: Builds the action of the drama by using the elements of drama, movement and voice skills.

DRAS2.4: Responds to and interprets drama experiences and performances.

Stage 2 – Music

MUS2.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, demonstrating a basic knowledge of musical concepts.

MUS2.2: Improvises musical phrases, organises sounds and explains reasons for choices.

MUS2.4: Identifies the use of musical concepts and musical symbols in a range of repertoire.

Stage 2 – Visual Arts

VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or beautiful by choosing amongst aspects of subject matter.

VAS2.2: Uses the forms to suggest the qualities of subject matter.

VAS2.4: Identifies connections between subject matter in artworks and what they refer to, and appreciates the use of particular techniques.

Stage 3 – Dance

DAS3.2: Explores, selects, organises and refines movement using the elements of dance to communicate intent.

Stage 3 – Drama

DRAS3.1: Develops a range of in-depth and sustained roles.

DRAS3.2: Interprets and conveys dramatic meaning by using the elements of drama and a range of movement and voice skills in a variety of drama forms.

DRAS3.4: Responds critically to a range of drama works and performance styles.

Stage 3 – Music

MUS3.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, individually and in groups, demonstrating a knowledge of musical concepts.

MUS3.2: Improvises, experiments, selects, combines and orders sound using musical concepts.

MUS3.4: Identifies the use of musical concepts and symbols in a range of musical styles.

Stage 3 – Visual Arts

VAS3.1: Investigates subject matter in an attempt to represent likenesses of things in the world.

VAS3.2: Makes artworks for different audiences assembling materials in a variety of ways.

VAS3.4: Communicates about the ways in which subject matter is represented in artworks.

Science | Technologies

Early Stage 1 – Science and technology

STe-1WS-S: Observes, questions and collects data to communicate ideas.

STe-4MW-ST: Identifies that objects are made of materials that have observable properties.

Stage 1 – Science and technology

ST1-1WS-S: Observes, questions and collects data to communicate and compare ideas.

ST1-6MW-S: Identifies that materials can be changed or combined.

Stage 2 – Science and technology

ST2-1WS-S: Questions, plans and conducts scientific investigations, collects and summarises data and communicates using scientific representations.

ST2-6MW-S: Describes how adding or removing heat causes a change of state.

Stage 3 – Science and technology

ST3-1WS-S: Plans and conducts scientific investigations to answer testable questions, and collects and summarises data to communicate conclusions.

ST3-6MW-S: Explains the effect of heat on the properties and behaviour of materials.

HSIE

Early Stage 1 – Geography

GEe-1: Identifies places and develops an understanding of the importance of places to people.

GEe-2: Communicates geographical information and uses geographical tools.

Stage 1 – Geography

GE1-1: Describes features of places and the connections people have with places.

GE1-3: Communicates geographical information and uses geographical tools for inquiry.

Stage 2 – Geography

GE2-1: Examines features and characteristics of places and environments.

GE2-4: Acquires and communicates geographical information using geographical tools for inquiry.

Stage 3 – Geography

GE3-1: Describes the diverse features and characteristics of places and environments.

GE3-4: Acquires, processes and communicates geographical information using geographical tools for inquiry.

Early Stage 1 – History

HTe-1: Communicates stories of their own family heritage and the heritage of others.

Stage 2 – History

HT2-1: Identifies celebrations and commemorations of significance in Australia and the world.

Stage 3 – History

HT3-2: Describes and explains different experiences of people living in Australia over time.

HT3-4: Describes and explains the struggles for rights and freedoms in Australia, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

PDHPE

Early Stage 1

PDe-1: Identifies who they are and how people grow and change.

PDe-2: Identifies people and demonstrates protective strategies that help keep themselves healthy, resilient and safe.

PDe-3: Communicates ways to be caring, inclusive and respectful of others.

PDe-9: Practises self-management skills in familiar and unfamiliar scenarios.

PDe-10: Uses interpersonal skills to effectively interact with others.

Stage 1

PD1-1: Describes the qualities and characteristics that make them similar and different to others.

PD1-2: Recognises and describes strategies people can use to feel comfortable, resilient and safe in situations.

PD1-3: Recognises and describes the qualities that enhance inclusive and respectful relationships.

PD1-9: Demonstrates self-management skills in taking responsibility for their own actions.

PD1-10: Describes and practises interpersonal skills to promote inclusion to make themselves and others feel they belong.

Stage 2

PD2-1: Explores strategies to manage physical, social and emotional change.

PD2-2: Explains and uses strategies to develop resilience and to make them feel comfortable and safe.

PD2-3: Explains how empathy, inclusion and respect can positively influence relationships.

PD2-7: Describes strategies to make home and school healthy, safe and physically active spaces.

PD2-9: Demonstrates self-management skills to respond to their own and others’ actions.

PD2-10: Demonstrates a range of interpersonal skills that build and enhance relationships and promote inclusion in various situations.

Stage 3

PD3-1: Identifies and applies strengths and strategies to manage life changes and transitions.

PD3-2: Investigates information, community resources and strategies to demonstrate resilience and seek help for themselves and others.

PD3-3: Evaluates the impact of empathy, inclusion and respect on themselves and others.

PD3-7: Proposes and implements actions and protective strategies that promote health, safety, wellbeing and physically active spaces.

PD3-9: Applies and adapts self-management skills to respond to personal and group situations.

PD3-10: Selects and uses interpersonal skills to interact respectfully with others to promote inclusion and build connections.

Vocabulary words

Teaching and learning activities

Select the activity to display its details.

To print out the following activities, please select the ‘Print this page’ button at the bottom of this screen.

Activity 1 – We’re not in Kansas anymore

Learning intention

Students will learn about the basic plot structure of The Wizard of Oz and be able to sequence elements of the story.

Success criteria

Students will be able to correctly sequence the elements of the plot. Stage 3 students will write a paragraph summarising the plot.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities, demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction, demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction
  • ENe-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 1

  • EN1-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 2

  • EN2-10C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 3

  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.

Resources

  • Attachment 1.1 – The Wizard of Oz
  • The Wizard of Oz (picture book or a YouTube read aloud)

Approximate time

45 minutes

Activity plan

  1. As the students walk into the room, ensure that The Wizard of Oz is written on the board. Pair younger and older students and have them write down everything that comes to mind when they hear that title. Share these ideas in a class brainstorm.
  2. Hand each pair a ‘yellow brick’ from Attachment 1.1. Have them read their brick which details a part of the story. As a class, work out the correct sequence of bricks to retell the basic storyline of The Wizard of Oz, based on what students already know.
  3. Read a picture book version of the story to the class or watch a read-aloud on YouTube. As you read or watch, adjust any ‘bricks’ that are out of place in the storyline that the class previously created.
  4. Explain that in this unit, the students are going to be focusing on all aspects of the story. K-4 students share with a partner what their favourite part of the story is and why. Stage 2 and Stage 3 students could also share their least favourite part of the story and why.
  5. Students in Stage 3 write a paragraph summarising the basic plot of the story.

Reflection

Place the bricks around the room and have students stand near the ‘brick’ that represents their favourite part of the story to finish off the activity.

Activity 2 – Once upon a time

Learning intention

Students will read and comprehend a fairy tale and be able to recount the plot, describe the setting and characters, and talk about their favourite and least favourite parts of the tale.

Success criteria

Each pair produces a poster that successfully outlines the fairy tale that they were given. Each pair shares that information with the rest of the class.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • ENe-4A: Demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies.
  • ENe-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • DRAES1.1: Uses imagination and the elements of drama in imaginative play and dramatic situations.

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • EN1-4A: Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN1-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • DRAS1.1: Takes on roles in drama to explore familiar and imagined situations.

Stage 2

  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.
  • EN2-4A: Uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN2-10C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • DRAS2.2: Builds the action of the drama by using the elements of drama, movement and voice skills.

Stage 3

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • EN3-3A: Uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies.
  • EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • DRAS3.2: Interprets and conveys dramatic meaning by using the elements of drama and a range of movement and voice skills in a variety of drama forms.

Resources

  • A collection of fairy tales in picture book format
  • Access to the internet and computers
  • Cardboard, pencils and textas

Approximate time

100 minutes

Activity plan

  1. As a class, brainstorm a list of fairy tales that students know (for example, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, and so on). Explain that The Wizard of Oz is considered to be America’s first fairy tale.
  2. As a class, discuss the typical way that a fairy tale begins (once upon a time, an introduction of characters, and so on). List some examples that the students know.
  3. As a class, discuss the typical way that a fairy tale ends (happily ever after, resolving any issues). List some examples that students know.
  4. Group the students into pairs (mixed ages/abilities).
  5. Give students in Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 very familiar tales, such as Cinderella or Three Little Pigs. You will need to read them the story first. Give students in Stage 2 less familiar tales, such as Peter Pan or Hansel and Gretel. Ask students in Stage 3 to research fairy tales from other cultures around the world.
  6. Each group is to read their fairy tale and then create a poster, outlining the plot, the main characters and the setting. Younger students can draw the plot sequence while older students will write a summary.
  7. Each group also practises acting out one small part of the tale, ready for presentation to the class.
  8. Once students have finished their posters, they present them, explaining the setting, characters and plot. They also have to talk about their favourite and least favourite parts of the story and act out one small part of the tale.

Reflection

Ask students to identify the similarities between the fairy tales they have explored during this activity.

Activity 3 – Grab the popcorn!

Learning intention

Students will watch the original 1939 film version of The Wizard of Oz and answer a series of comprehension questions.

Success criteria

Completed comprehension questions. All students participate in discussion about the last question.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • ENe-4A: Demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies
  • ENe-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • EN1-4A: Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN1-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 2

  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.
  • EN2-4A: Uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN2-10C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 3

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • EN3-3A: Uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies.
  • EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.

Resources

Approximate time

180 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Group the students according to age groups/abilities, so that they can answer the comprehension questions as they move through the film.
  2. Watch the 1939 version of the film, stopping at appropriate times to let students answer the questions on their worksheets and discuss what is happening.
    • The first suggested stop is just before the tornado strikes.
    • The second is just before Dorothy heads off on the yellow brick road.
    • The third is just before the friends reach the Emerald City.
    • The fourth is after the Wicked Witch of the West is killed.
    • The fifth is at the end of the film.
  3. After the movie has finished and students have completed their worksheets, discuss some of the answers to different questions, as each stage group has looked at slightly different issues.

Reflection

As a whole class, discuss the last question on the Stage 3 worksheet: Could Dorothy have gone home right at the start?

Activity 4 – So many versions!

Learning intention

Students learn to arrange dates associated with versions of The Wizard of Oz in chronological order on a timeline. Students will be able to discuss ideas related to position when describing the dates and be able to manipulate the four-digit numbers.

Success criteria

Students will demonstrate the skill of arranging the dates in chronological order. Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 will be able to describe the dates using language of position. Stage 2 and Stage 3 will be able to find the difference between four-digit numbers.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • MAe-1WM: Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
  • MAe-2WM: Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.
  • MAe-13MG: Sequences events, uses everyday language to describe the durations of events, and reads hour time on clocks.
  • MAe-16MG: Describes position and gives and follows simple directions using everyday language.

Stage 1

  • MA1-1WM: Describes mathematical situations and methods using everyday and some mathematical language, actions materials, diagrams and symbols.
  • MA1-2WM: Uses objects, diagrams and technology to explore mathematical problems.
  • MA1-4NA: Applies place value, informally, to count, order, read and represent two and three digit numbers.
  • MA1-16MG: Represents and describes the positions of objects in everyday situations and on maps.

Stage 2

  • MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent mathematical ideas.
  • MA2-2WM: Selects and uses appropriate mental or written strategies, or technology, to solve problems.
  • MA2-4NA: Applies place value to order, read and represent numbers of up to five digits.
  • MA2-5NA: Uses mental and written strategies for addition and subtraction involving two, three, four and five digit numbers.

Stage 3

  • MA3-1WM: Describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some conventions.
  • MA3-2WM: Selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies, including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking investigations.
  • MA3-4NA: Orders, reads and represents integers of any size and describes properties of whole numbers.
  • MA3-5NA: Selects and applies appropriate strategies for addition and subtraction with counting numbers of any size.

Resources

Approximate time

40 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Ask the students whether or not they think that The Wizard of Oz movie was the first time that this particular story had been told. Vote yes or no. Inform them that, in fact, the story had already been around for many, many years and has been told in lots of different ways.
  2. Brainstorm all the different ways that you can tell a story (movies, dances, novels, picture books, TV shows, cartoons and so on). Explain that The Wizard of Oz has been featured in many of these, and in lots more. In this activity, they are going to learn about just some of those many versions.
  3. Split students into groups of mixed ages and abilities. Randomly hand out the cards on Attachment 4.1, so that each group has a roughly even number of cards from different years. Explain what a timeline is and how we use it. Discuss what students know about chronological order.
  4. Each group is to read the cards that they have about different versions of The Wizard of Oz. As a class, they are to put the cards in chronological order on a timeline that you draw on the board (from 1900 until 2019).
  5. Ask the students a series of questions, based on the timeline. Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 students can be asked questions such as which card came first out of a few different ones, which card is next to another card, which card is on the left of a card, which card is between two different cards, and so on.
  6. Stage 2 and Stage 3 students can be asked similar questions, but also asked to work out how many years between the 1939 movie and the original book, between the book of Wicked and the Broadway musical, and so on.

Reflection

Discuss whether students were surprised at how many different versions of The Wizard of Oz there were. Explain that there are literally hundreds more that they might like to investigate. Display the timeline in the classroom for reference in further activities.

Activity 5 – Before and after

Learning intention

Students will develop an understanding of prequels and sequels. Students will understand what a prefix and suffix are and how they are used. Students will understand what an adaptation is and will adapt a well-known fairy tale.

Success criteria

Students will demonstrate the ability to adapt the Three Little Pigs. Students will identify root words, prefixes and suffixes.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • ENe-4A: Demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies
  • ENe-9B: Demonstrates developing skills and knowledge in grammar, punctuation and vocabulary when responding to and composing texts.
  • ENe-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • EN1-4A: Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN1-9B: Uses basic grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary appropriate to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.
  • EN1-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 2

  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.
  • EN2-4A: Uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN2-9B: Uses effective and accurate sentence structure, grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary relevant to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.
  • EN2-10C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.

Stage 3

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies.
  • EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.

Resources

Approximate time

100 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Review the previous activity and all of the different versions of The Wizard of Oz.
  2. Ask older students whether they have ever heard of a prequel or a sequel. Ask students to look back at the timeline and name one of the prequels to The Wizard of Oz and one of the sequels.
  3. Hand out one copy of Attachment 5.1 to each of the groups from the previous activity. Have a student read the definition of a prequel out loud. Discuss. Have another student read the definition of a sequel out loud. Discuss.
  4. Have students work in their group to try to work out the prequel and/or sequel to some well-known movies and books. They are to fill in the boxes that are shaded yellow. Discuss answers and fill in any that they missed. The answers are provided in Attachment 5.2.
  5. Discuss why filmmakers or authors might write a prequel or sequel (to continue the story, to fill in gaps, to make more money, to develop a character more, to tell a different side to the story).
  6. Explain that we do something similar with spelling. Sometimes we add a part to the beginning of a word or the end of a word to create a different meaning. We call the original word the ‘root word’. Students work in their groups to come up with some prefixes and suffixes to complete the table on the worksheet.
  7. Referencing the timeline from the previous activity, ask students to look at the description of The Wiz. Was it a prequel? Was it a sequel? No – discuss the fact that it is an adaptation.
  8. Write the definition for adaptation on the board: To make something suitable for a new use or purpose, or to modify. Discuss times when we adapt things (clothes, classrooms, playground areas).
  9. Watch The Wiz – The crows scene featuring You Can’t Win.
  10. Discuss ways in which the original story and character of the Scarecrow have been adapted in this version. Draw a Venn diagram on the board, exploring the similarities and differences.
  11. Any story can be adapted to a different setting or time. Put the students into mixed age groups. Their challenge is to adapt the story of the Three Little Pigs so that the characters are people and it is set at the beach. What would the houses be made of? What sort of person would the wolf be? What would the ‘pigs’ be like? Each group is to recreate the story of the Three Little Pigs, adapted to the new requirements, and present their story to the class. They should limit their story to 3-5 minutes.

Reflection

Ask students what other fairy tale they would enjoy adapting.

Activity 6 – It’s a twister!

Learning intention

Students will learn about the difference and similarities between tornadoes and cyclones. Students will know what the emergency procedures are for their school and how to contact emergency services.

Success criteria

Students will be able to identify the key differences between tornadoes and cyclones. Students will be able to describe the emergency procedures at school.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • GEe-2: Communicates geographical information and uses geographical tools.
  • PDe-2: Identifies people and demonstrates protective strategies that help keep themselves healthy, resilient and safe.

Stage 1

  • GE1-3: Communicates geographical information and uses geographical tools for inquiry.
  • PD1-2: Recognises and describes strategies people can use to feel comfortable, resilient and safe in situations.

Stage 2

  • GE2-4: Acquires and communicates geographical information using geographical tools for inquiry.
  • PD2-7: Describes strategies to make home and school healthy, safe and physically active spaces.

Stage 3

  • GE3-4: Acquires, processes and communicates geographical information using geographical tools for inquiry.
  • PD3-7: Proposes and implements actions and protective strategies that promote health, safety, wellbeing and physically active spaces.

Resources

Approximate time

120 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Ask the students to remember what happened in The Wizard of Oz to make Dorothy travel to the Land of Oz (a tornado). Brainstorm what students already know about tornados.
  2. Hand out Attachment 6.1 to students in Stages 1, 2 and 3.
  3. Explain that there are differences between tornadoes, like the one that Dorothy was stuck in, and cyclones, which we have here in Australia.
  4. Watch How do tornadoes form? and Cyclones Explained then have students fill in as many details as they can on the Venn diagram. Discuss the similarities and differences between the two.
  5. Put the students into groups (mixed ages/abilities). Explain that they are going to create their own ‘tornado’ in a bottle. Hand out Attachment 6.2.
  6. Students collect their equipment and conduct the experiment. Ensure that all members of the group are taking part in the activity. Discuss what happened in the experiment.
  7. Reflect on the part of the movie when Dorothy’s family was getting ready for the tornado to hit. Did they have an emergency plan? What was it?
  8. Ask whether students know what to do if there is an emergency at school. Discuss the emergency procedures that your school has (fire in a building, bushfire, flood, lockdown procedures).
  9. Split students into groups. Ask them to create posters that detail the plan for one of these emergencies and display them in the classroom. Practise the emergency drills that your school has in place.

Reflection

Ask students whether any of them have emergency plans at home for events such as bushfires. What kinds of preparations do they think would be needed to protect homes during events such as this?

Activity 7 – Follow the yellow brick road

Learning intention

Students will be able to compare two different styles of music and will understand the difference between beat and rhythm. Students will be able to describe the properties of rectangles, measure length, perimeter and area, and create tessellating patterns. Students will compose a dance to share with the class.

Success criteria

Dances that reflect the mood and tempo of the songs. Students able to maintain a beat, regardless of rhythm. The class successfully creates the yellow brick road to specifications and is able to answer all teacher questions.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • MAe-1WM: Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
  • MAe-2WM: Uses objects, actions, technology and/or trial and error to explore mathematical problems.
  • MAe-9MG: Describes and compares lengths and distances using everyday language.
  • MAe-10MG: Describes and compares areas using everyday language.
  • MAe-15MG: Manipulates, sorts and describes representations of two-dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, squares and rectangles, using everyday language.
  • DAES1.2: Explores movement in response to a stimulus to express ideas, feelings or moods.
  • MUES1.1: Participates in simple speech, singing, playing and moving activities, demonstrating an awareness of musical concepts.
  • MUES1.4: Listens to and responds to music.

Stage 1

  • MA1-9MG: Measures, records, compares and estimates lengths and distances using uniform informal units, metres and centimetres.
  • MA1-10MG: Measures, records, compares and estimates areas using uniform informal units.
  • MA1-15MG: Manipulates, sorts, represents, describes and explores two-dimensional shapes, including quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons and octagons.
  • DAS1.2: Explores and selects movement using the elements of dance to make dance express ideas, feelings or moods.
  • MUS1.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, demonstrating an awareness of musical concepts.
  • MUS1.4: Responds to a range of music, expressing likes and dislikes and the reasons for these choices.

Stage 2

  • MA2-9MG: Measures, records, compares and estimates lengths, distances and perimeters in metres, centimetres and millimetres.
  • MA2-10MG: Measures, records, compares and estimates areas using square centimetres and square metres.
  • MA2-15MG: Manipulates, identifies and sketches two-dimensional shapes, including special quadrilaterals, and describes their features.
  • DAS2.2: Explores, selects and combines movement using the elements of dance to communicate ideas, feelings or moods.
  • MUS2.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, demonstrating a basic knowledge of musical concepts.
  • MUS2.4: Identifies the use of musical concepts and musical symbols in a range of repertoire.

Stage 3

  • MA3-9MG: Selects and uses the appropriate unit and device to measure lengths and distances, calculates perimeter and converts between units of length.
  • MA3-10MG: Selects and uses the appropriate unit to calculate areas, including areas of squares, rectangles and triangles.
  • MA3-16MG: Measures and constructs angles, and applies angle relationships to find unknown angles.
  • DAS3.2: Explores, selects, organises and refines movement using the elements of dance to communicate intent.
  • MUS3.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, individually and in groups, demonstrating a knowledge of musical concepts.
  • MUS3.4: Identifies the use of musical concepts and symbols in a range of musical styles.

Resources

Approximate time

90 minutes

Activity plan

  1. As students walk in, play Follow the Yellow Brick Road from The Wizard of Oz in the background.
  2. Explain that in this activity, they are going to create the yellow brick road in the classroom. Brainstorm what students remember about the yellow brick road from the movie. What will be important to include? (rectangular bricks, yellow, meandering path)
  3. Ask the students what they know about ‘beat’ in music. What is it? Ask the students what ‘rhythm’ is in music. What is the difference between the two?
  4. Ask the students to stand and march in time to a simple four-beat pattern. Explain that they are marching in time to the beat. Have them continue marching in time to a simple beat but clap a different rhythm over the top. Focus on them keeping the beat, not mimicking the rhythm. Talk about why it is difficult and the need to focus. Ask the older (or more musically capable students) to keep marching on the beat, and the other students to copy your rhythm.
  5. Play Follow the Yellow Brick Road from The Wizard of Oz again and ask one group to march in time to the beat and one group to clap the rhythm. Swap over.
  6. The following activities will vary according to the students’ stage. Students will be creating the yellow brick road and each stage group has a different job.
    • Stage 1 and Early Stage 1

      Students work with you on the definition of a rectangle. What does it need to have? They are going to be cutting out a series of rectangles once they have the dimensions from Stage 2. Stage 1 students will measure and draw the rectangles. Discuss the fact that the width is half of the length. Talk about the need for halves to be even. Early Stage 1 students will cut them out or measure and draw them, if able. Any SLSOs or volunteers could assist with this group. At some point, discuss which side is longer and which is shorter. Once some of the path is laid, look at the first metre of the path. Talk about how to work out the area, using the informal measure of one brick. Discuss what area is.

    • Stage 2

      Stage 2 students will work out how to make a path which is 1/2 metre wide. The students need to calculate how long the bricks would need to be if there are to be five bricks across. They then need to work out how wide the bricks need to be if the width is half of the length. The bricks should be 10cm long and 5cm wide. The students also need to work out the perimeter and area of these bricks.

      Once the younger students have the dimensions, work with the Stage 2 students to check their perimeter measurement and talk about tessellations. They will be in charge of creating a tessellating pattern with the bricks, using rotations, reflections and/or translations. Discuss the differences. They will have to explain what they did and what a translation is to the class later in the activity. Once the bricks are made, Stage 2 is responsible for laying the path itself following their pattern.

    • Stage 3

      Stage 3 students will work out where the path is going to go on the floor of the classroom/hall/outside area. It must include some turns. There must be at least two acute angle turns. There must be at least two obtuse angle turns. There must be at least one reflex angle turn.

      Give these students the dimensions of the bricks (10cm x 5cm). Their job is to work out what the perimeter of each brick and the area of each brick will be. They should work out the length of the entire path that they have laid out. How long is this in metres, centimetres and millimetres?

Reflection

Clap some rhythms and beats, each time asking the students whether you are clapping a rhythm or a beat.

Activity 8 – Home sweet home

Learning intention

Students will know what to do if they get lost and will be able to represent the feeling of being lost in words and images. Students will identify key features of their own homes and what makes a house a home.

Success criteria

Students will produce an image that reflects the feeling of being lost. The class will produce a poem which uses all five senses and is in first person. Students will be able to draw and describe key features of their home.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-2A: Composes simple texts to convey an idea or message.
  • VAES1.1: Makes simple pictures and other kinds of artworks about things and experiences.
  • GEe-1: Identifies places and develops an understanding of the importance of places to people.
  • HTe-1: Communicates stories of their own family heritage and the heritage of others.
  • PDe-2: Identifies people and demonstrates protective strategies that help keep themselves healthy, resilient and safe.

Stage 1

  • EN1-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes familiar topics for known readers and viewers.
  • MA1-16MG: Represents and describes the positions of objects in everyday situations and on maps.
  • VAS1.1: Makes artworks in a particular way about experiences of real and imaginary things.
  • GE1-1: Describes features of places and the connections people have with places.
  • PD1-2: Recognises and describes strategies people can use to feel comfortable, resilient and safe in situations.

Stage 2

  • EN2-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a range of texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and language.
  • VAS2.1: Represents the qualities of experiences and things that are interesting or beautiful by choosing among aspects of subject matter.
  • GE2-1: Examines features and characteristics of places and environments.
  • PD2-7: Describes strategies to make home and school healthy, safe and physically active spaces.

Stage 3

  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.
  • VAS3.1: Investigates subject matter in an attempt to represent likenesses of things in the world.
  • GE3-1: Describes the diverse features and characteristics of places and environments.
  • PD3-7: Proposes and implements actions and protective strategies that promote health, safety, wellbeing and physically active spaces.

Resources

Approximate time

90 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Discuss: What is it that Dorothy wants throughout the whole movie (to go home)? Is she lost? Have the students ever been lost? How did they feel? How did they react? Split students into groups (mixed ages/abilities) and give each one a different scenario card from Attachment 8.1.
  2. Give each group time to discuss what they would do in their scenario. Come back together as a class to discuss the scenarios and strategies.
  3. As a class, write a short poem about being lost. Be sure to write it in the first person. Discuss what writing in first person looks like. The poem needs to include all five senses. What would it smell like, feel like, sound like? (For example, I’m lost! I can only see faces that I don’t know. I can smell the fear on my breath.) Display the class poem on the board.
  4. Hand out Attachment 8.2. Students are to draw an illustration that reflects how they are feeling, using their own ideas and the poem that the class composed together. After the activity, display the poem and the illustrations in the classroom.
  5. Reflect on why Dorothy wants to go home. What is so special about home? Brainstorm positive words and phrases that students can think of associated with home. What does a home need to have? Are all homes the same? When would a house not be a home? Discuss with the class.
  6. Hand out Attachments 8.3 to 8.6 as appropriate and ask students to complete them. Be sure to ask Stage 1 to describe where things are in their home using the everyday language of position (next to, behind, between, and so on).
  7. As a class, listen to Home from The Wiz and discuss how Dorothy feels about her home in this song. How can you tell? How does she use her facial expressions to convey this?

Reflection

Students tell a partner what makes their home special for them and/or what they are most grateful for about their home.

Activity 9 – Over the rainbow

Learning intention

Students will recognise the use of colour in texts to help convey meaning. Students will work together to create a text that explains the metaphors associated with colours. Students will learn how to sing Over the Rainbow.

Success criteria

Posters that explain the meaning and use of different colours. A class performance of Over the Rainbow. Discussion about the use of colour in The Wizard of Oz.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-4A: Demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies.
  • ENe-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • MUES1.1: Participates in simple speech, singing, playing and moving activities, demonstrating an awareness of musical concepts.
  • VAES1.4: Communicates their ideas about pictures and other kinds of artworks.

Stage 1

  • EN1-4A: Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN1-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • MUS1.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, demonstrating an awareness of musical concepts.
  • VAS1.4: Begins to interpret the meaning of artworks, acknowledging the roles of artist and audience.

Stage 2

  • EN2-4A: Uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN2-10C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • MUS2.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, demonstrating a basic knowledge of musical concepts.
  • VAS2.4: Identifies connections between subject matter in artworks and what they refer to, and appreciates the use of particular techniques.

Stage 3

  • EN3-3A: Uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies.
  • EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • MUS3.1: Sings, plays and moves to a range of music, individually and in groups, demonstrating a knowledge of musical concepts.
  • VAS3.4: Communicates about the ways in which subject matter is represented in artworks.

Resources

Approximate time

70 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Put the students into small groups (mixed ages/abilities) and give them a piece of A4 paper. Write the following question on the board and have each group discuss it and write their answers on the A4 paper. ‘How did the author and filmmakers use colour to help tell the story of The Wizard of Oz?’
  2. Come back as a class to discuss together. Be sure to include in the discussion the yellow brick road, ruby slippers (silver slippers in the book), green skin for Elphaba (the Wicked Witch of the West), black and white for the two witches, the Emerald City, the beginning of the film in sepia (note: you will need to define what sepia looks like). Discuss the fact that when the 1939 movie came out, colour in film was relatively new. The producers changed the silver slippers to ruby and the witch’s face to green, to make it look more colourful. This was continued in Wicked and has become one of the most recognisable features of the musical. Watch Flying Lessons – Ep 3 – The Look about the makeup in Wicked.
  3. Explain that different colours are traditionally used for different purposes, for example, red for anger or power, purple for royalty. Divide the class into mixed ability groups. Allocate each group a colour to research. They are to create a poster that explains their colour and what it traditionally represents. They should include some images from the internet that demonstrate this. One site to try for research is Color Meaning.
  4. Groups report back to the class about their colour and present their poster to be displayed in the classroom.
  5. Brainstorm what students already know about rainbows. When do we see them, what colours are included, why do they form?
  6. Ask students whether they have heard stories or songs that refer to rainbows? Discuss the idea of a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow.
  7. Discuss the use of the rainbow in The Wizard of Oz. Why does Dorothy imagine a life ‘over the rainbow’? Watch Over the Rainbow from The Wizard of Oz. What message were the songwriters trying to get across in this song?
  8. Hand out the lyrics to Over the Rainbow (Attachment 9.1) and learn the song as a class. If possible, perform the song at an assembly at the end of the unit or record it for future viewing.

Reflection

Students discuss with a partner what they would hope to find ‘over the rainbow’.

Activity 10 – We’re off to see the Wizard

Learning intention

Students will write a narrative and design some shoes that reflect a wish that they have. Students will choreograph a simple dance, using just their feet.

Success criteria

Narratives reflecting the granting of a wish. A pair of magic slippers designed. A simple dance choreographed.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-2A: Composes simple texts to convey an idea or message.
  • DAES1.2: Explores movement in response to a stimulus to express ideas, feelings or moods.
  • VAES1.2: Experiments with a range of media in selected forms.

Stage 1

  • EN1-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers.
  • DAS1.2: Explores and selects movement using the elements of dance to make dance express ideas, feelings or moods.
  • VAS1.2: Uses the forms to make artworks according to varying requirements.

Stage 2

  • EN2-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a range of texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and language.
  • DAS2.2: Explores, selects and combines movement using the elements of dance to communicate ideas, feelings or moods.
  • VAS2.2: Uses the forms to suggest the qualities of subject matter.

Stage 3

  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.
  • DAS3.2: Explores, selects, organises and refines movement using the elements of dance to communicate intent.
  • VAS3.2: Makes artworks for different audiences assembling materials in a variety of ways.

Resources

Approximate time

120 minutes

Activity plan

  1. As the students walk into the room, play We’re Off to See the Wizard from The Wizard of Oz.
  2. Ask the students where Dorothy is heading on the yellow brick road (The Emerald City). Who are they hoping to find there? (The Wizard).
  3. Hand out Attachment 10.1. Work through the questions together as a class. Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 students only need to answer in single sentences. Stage 2 and Stage 3 need to answer in multiple sentences and explain why the characters are wishing for those things.
  4. Review the basic structure of a narrative. Students are given 30 minutes to write a narrative in which they are granted their wish. Students will have different expectations about the length and detail of their narrative, depending on their stage level.
  5. Discuss what Dorothy had to do to achieve her wish. In reality, she had to rely on the ruby slippers. If you could have magic shoes, what magical powers would you give them?
  6. Hand out Attachment 10.2. Students are to design their own magic slippers to achieve their wish. Discuss the use of colours (as per the previous activity). It is up to the teacher whether this activity is restricted to just designing the shoes on paper or whether students bring in cheap volleys or similar shoes and decorate an actual pair of shoes. Even if only on paper, try to incorporate different materials to make the artwork three dimensional: glitter, beads, laces, material, and so on.
  7. If students have used actual shoes, wait until they are dry/complete and ask students to put their magic shoes on.
  8. Students are going to use their magic shoes as inspiration for some dance moves using just their feet. They will be using their moves to dance along to a song from The Wiz called A Brand New Day. Play A Brand New Day from The Wiz so that students know what the music will sound like. Use the Footloose – Opening scene video as inspiration for a dance involving just feet. Give students time to work out their dance moves in small groups.

Reflection

Play A Brand New Day from The Wiz and let students demonstrate their dance moves.

Activity 11 – Witches in every direction

Learning intention

Students understand the points of the compass and can use these to follow a course. Students write a description of a witch, with increasing details, depending on stage level.

Success criteria

Descriptions of the witches. Successful completion of navigation courses.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • ENe-2A: Composes simple texts to convey an idea or message.
  • MAe-16MG: Describes position and gives and follows simple directions using everyday language.

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • MA1-16MG: Represents and describes the positions of objects in everyday situations.

Stage 2

  • EN2-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a range of texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and language.
  • MA2-17MG: Uses simple maps and grids to represent position and follow routes, including using compass directions.

Stage 3

  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.

Resources

  • Compasses

Approximate time

90 minutes

Activity plan

  1. As the students walk in, have an 8-pointed compass star on the board (no labels). Ask them to discuss what they think it is. Add the N, E, S, W labels and then see if they know what it is. Discuss what a compass is and what it is used for. Ask students to talk about the times that they have used or seen a compass.
  2. Talk a bit more about N, E, S, W and how to remember which order the compass points go in. Discuss acronyms that are useful, for example, Never Eat Soggy Weet-Bix.
  3. Have students draw the compass star in their books and label it. Ask what we know about the witches from Oz. They are connected to the compass star. Add the names that we know onto the star in the students’ books – Glinda is the Good Witch of the South in the original book, Elphaba is the Wicked Witch of the West in Wicked. Let the class as a whole create their new names for the Good Witch of the North and the Wicked Witch of the East, who is crushed by Dorothy’s house.
  4. At this point, have students in Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 draw pictures to go with each of the witches on their compass. Students in Stage 2 and Stage 3 should then be taught about the four intermediate cardinal points (NE, SE, SW, NW). They can then work together to come up with some names for those witches as well. Be sure that everybody in Stage 2 and Stage 3 has the same witches’ names on their pages.
  5. Group the class into mixed age groups. They now have the task of creating a navigation course for another group to follow, using the 8 compass points. (For example, they might start at the basketball court.) Follow Glinda for 10 steps. Turn and chase after Elphaba for 20 steps and so on. These instructions should be written down.
  6. Once groups have completed their navigation course, they are to swap with another group to complete their course. This can be repeated with other groups.
  7. Students come back to the class. They can now choose one of the ‘new’ witches that were created by the class. They are to create a character profile for that witch.
    • Early Stage 1 students can write the name of the witch and draw what she looks like, as well as writing three words to describe her.
    • Stage 1 students can write the name, draw a picture and write one paragraph describing what she looks like.
    • Stage 2 students can do the above and add details about what her motivation is – What does she most want in Oz?
    • Stage 3 students can do the above as well as writing a short diary entry as that witch, detailing what they were thinking on the day that Dorothy arrived in Oz.

Reflection

Allow some students to share their diary entries or descriptions.

Activity 12 – I’m melting!

Learning intention

Students will conduct a simple experiment, observing how different variables affect the melting speed of ice. Students will learn about the importance of variables and controls in science experiments. Students will re-enact a scene using voice and movement to convey meaning.

Success criteria

Students successfully document the results of the experiment. Class discussion about variables and controls. Students use voice and movement to convey meaning in a dramatic scene.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • DRAES1.1: Uses imagination and the elements of drama in imaginative play and dramatic situations.
  • STe-1WS-S: Observes, questions and collects data to communicate ideas.
  • STe-4MW-ST: Identifies that objects are made of materials that have observable properties.

Stage 1

  • DRAS1.2: Conveys story, depicts events and expresses feelings by using the elements of drama and the expressive skills of movement and voice.
  • ST1-1WS-S: Observes, questions and collects data to communicate and compare ideas.
  • ST1-6MW-S: Identifies that materials can be changed or combined.

Stage 2

  • DRAS2.2: Builds the action of the drama by using the elements of drama, movement and voice skills.
  • ST2-1WS-S: Questions, plans and conducts scientific investigations, collects and summarises data and communicates using scientific representations.
  • ST2-6MW-S: Describes how adding or removing heat causes a change of state.

Stage 3

  • DRAS3.2: Interprets and conveys dramatic meaning by using the elements of drama and a range of movement and voice skills in a variety of drama forms.
  • ST3-1WS-S: Plans and conducts scientific investigations to answer testable questions, and collects and summarises data to communicate conclusions.
  • ST3-6MW-S: Explains the effect of heat on the properties and behaviour of materials.

Resources

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. The day before this activity, complete step one of Attachment 12.1 – Fill six firm cupcake liners with water and freeze overnight.
  2. Watch The Wizard of Oz – I’m melting scene, where the witch melts from coming into contact with water.
  3. Students discuss with a learning partner, whether Dorothy meant to melt the witch. Do they think that Dorothy would have done it deliberately if she had thought of it?
  4. Give each pair a piece of fabric or sheet. Ask them to practise and then perform their own version of Dorothy melting the witch, complete with a disappearance under the material. Ask them to focus on facial expressions for Dorothy and the use of voice for the witch.
  5. Split students into groups. Hand out Attachment 12.1. Read through with the class.
  6. Ask students to write their predictions about what is going to happen.
  7. Ask each group to complete the experiment.
  8. Discuss the results. Discuss how the experiment would have gone differently if the ice blocks were of a different size. What was the only thing that changed in this experiment (the variable added)? Why was there a control block of ice?

Reflection

Students share with a partner what surprised them the most during this experiment. 

Activity 13 – Wicked or good

Learning intention

Students will understand what a synonym and antonym are. Students will discuss the typical characteristics of ‘good’ and ‘wicked’ characters in stories, movies and illustrations. Students will discuss the importance of not judging a book by its cover.

Success criteria

Students will be able to list synonyms and antonyms for ‘good’ and ‘wicked’. Students will be able to identify the use of visual imagery in picture books.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • ENe-4A: Demonstrates developing skills and strategies to read, view and comprehend short, predictable texts on familiar topics in different media and technologies.
  • ENe-9B: Demonstrates developing skills and knowledge in grammar, punctuation and vocabulary when responding to and composing texts.
  • ENe-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • VAES1.4: Communicates their ideas about pictures and other kinds of artworks.
  • PDe-3: Communicates ways to be caring, inclusive and respectful of others.

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • EN1-4A: Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on less familiar topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN1-9B: Uses basic grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary appropriate to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.
  • EN1-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • VAS1.4: Begins to interpret the meaning of artworks, acknowledging the roles of artist and audience.
  • PD1-3: Recognises and describes the qualities that enhance inclusive and respectful relationships.

Stage 2

  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.
  • EN2-4A: Uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies.
  • EN2-9B: Uses effective and accurate sentence structure, grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary relevant to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.
  • EN2-10C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • VAS2.4: Identifies connections between subject matter in artworks and what they refer to, and appreciates the use of particular techniques.
  • PD2-3: Explains how empathy, inclusion and respect can positively influence relationships.

Stage 3

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • EN3-3A: Uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies.
  • EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies.
  • EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • VAS3.4: Communicates about the ways in which subject matter is represented in artworks.
  • PD3-3: Evaluates the impact of empathy, inclusion and respect on themselves and others.

Resources

Approximate time

40 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Write the word ‘wicked’ on the board. Discuss what a synonym is. As a class, students will brainstorm as many synonyms as they can for that word.
  2. Ask the students what they think the opposite of ‘wicked’ is (good). Write it up on the board. Discuss that the opposite is called an antonym. Brainstorm other synonyms for ’good’.
  3. Hand out Attachments 13.1 and 13.2. Discuss with students and then have them complete the worksheets. Younger students will need assistance. Discuss their answers.
  4. Put students into mixed age groups. Visit your school library or hand out a collection of picture books. Ask students to identify the ‘wicked’ and ‘good’ characters in the stories, just by looking at the pictures. Do the books follow the same pattern in relation to looks and whether a character is ‘wicked’ or ‘good’?
  5. Ask each group to come and present their findings from their books and show examples of illustrations to back up their arguments.

Reflection

Discuss how the story of The Wizard of Oz would have been different if Glinda was an old woman and the Wicked Witch was beautiful. 

Activity 14 – Poor Elphaba!

Learning intention

Students will understand the definition of bullying and the role that power has in bullying situations. Students will understand the important role of the ‘upstander’.

Success criteria

Students will dramatically represent bullying and upstanding. Students can explain what bullying is and the role of power in bullying situations.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • DRAES1.1: Uses imagination and the elements of drama in imaginative play and dramatic situations.
  • PDe-3: Communicates ways to be caring, inclusive and respectful of others.
  • PDe-10: Uses interpersonal skills to effectively interact with others.

Stage 1

  • DRAS1.1: Takes on roles in drama to explore familiar and imagined situations.
  • PD1-3: Recognises and describes the qualities that enhance inclusive and respectful relationships.
  • PD1-10: Describes and practises interpersonal skills to promote inclusion to make themselves and others feel they belong.

Stage 2

  • DRAS2.1: Takes on and sustains roles in a variety of drama forms to express meaning in a wide range of imagined situations.
  • PD2-3: Explains how empathy, inclusion and respect can positively influence relationships.
  • PD2-10: Demonstrates a range of interpersonal skills that build and enhance relationships and promote inclusion in various situations.

Stage 3

  • DRAS3.1: Develops a range of in-depth and sustained roles.
  • PD3-3: Evaluates the impact of empathy, inclusion and respect on themselves and others.
  • PD3-10: Selects and uses interpersonal skills to interact respectfully with others to promote inclusion and build connections.

Resources

Approximate time

120 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Google an image of Elphaba from Wicked and have it on the board when the students walk into class. Let them talk about what they see. Pose the question for students to discuss in pairs: What do you think would happen if a student looking like this enrolled at your school? How would people react? Let pairs discuss and then discuss as a class. Ask students to be brutally honest about how people would really react.
  2. Discuss the following questions: What assumptions did you automatically make about this person? How does that affect how you would treat them? Would you hang out with them?
  3. In their pairs, ask students to write a definition for the word ‘bullying’. What does it mean to them? Show What is bullying? – National definition of bullying, which introduces the national definition of bullying for Australian schools. Discuss as a class.
  4. Google an image of Glinda from Wicked to show on the board. Ask students to work in pairs to write down all of the words that they can think of to describe Glinda (be sure to team Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 students with an older peer). Discuss some of their ideas. What sort of a person do you assume that she is and why?
  5. Turn the discussion to the idea of Glinda being popular. Discuss what this means. What sort of person is usually popular at school? Why is that? Is it always good to be popular? Why or why not?
  6. Have students discuss in their pairs, and then with the class, who they think would have more power at school – Glinda or Elphaba? Discuss why.
  7. Reflect on the video which explained that one of the key elements of bullying is an imbalance of power. Being popular gives you some power at school, but what else can you do to gain power in a relationship? Discuss as a class (self-belief, tell a trusted adult, support of other students, and so on).
  8. Split students into three groups.
    • One group is going to role-play a scene at school, where Glinda is using her power to bully Elphaba.
    • A second group will role-play the same scene, but Glinda is using her power to help Elphaba.
    • A third group will role-play a scene where Elphaba uses a different sort of power to stop the bullying. (Note that this particular part of the activity is better suited to Stages 2 or 3, while Stage 1 students could observe.)
  9. Give the groups time to develop their scene and then show them to the class. Discuss, after each scene, how power was used in each of these situations.
  10. Ask students what they would do if they saw bullying happening to somebody else? Would you be brave enough to step in? What if you didn’t have any power in that situation? Introduce the term ‘bystander’. Discuss what it means. Explain that one way that we can stop bullying is by focusing on those ‘bystanders’ and turning them into ‘upstanders’. Watch Be an Upstander – Prevent Bullying and discuss.
  11. Students break into the same groups to role-play a situation in which an ‘upstander’ demonstrates power to end a bullying situation.

Reflection

As a whole class, stand up and recite the following pledge that you could have on the board:

  • I promise that I will be an upstander.
  • I will speak out to help others.
  • I will show courage to make sure that everybody is safe.
  • I have the power to help.

Activity 15 – Wingardium Leviosa!

Learning intention

Students will understand the conventions associated with procedural texts. Students will examine a dramatic performance of a spell to analyse it for use of voice and facial expression to convey meaning.

Success criteria

Students will be able to identify some key features of the dramatic performance of No Good Deed. Students will write their own procedural text in the form of a spell. Students will read their spell with appropriate facial expression and use of voice.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • ENe-2A: Composes simple texts to convey an idea or message.
  • ENe-3A: Produces most lower case and upper case letters and uses digital technologies to construct texts.
  • ENe-9B: Demonstrates developing skills and knowledge in grammar, punctuation and vocabulary when responding to and composing texts.
  • DRAES1.4: Responds to dramatic experiences

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • EN1-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers.
  • EN1-3A: Composes texts using letters of consistent size and slope and uses digital technologies.
  • EN1-9B: Uses basic grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary appropriate to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.
  • DRAS1.4: Appreciates dramatic work during the making of their own drama and the drama of others.

Stage 2

  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.
  • EN2-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a range of texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and language.
  • EN2-3A: Uses effective handwriting and publishes texts using digital technologies.
  • EN2-9B: Uses effective and accurate sentence structure, grammatical features, punctuation conventions and vocabulary relevant to the type of text when responding to and composing texts.
  • DRAS2.4: Responds to and interprets drama experiences and performances.

Stage 3

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.
  • EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies.
  • DRAS3.4: Responds critically to a range of drama works and performance styles.

Resources

Approximate time

100 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Write the word ‘witch’ on the board before the students come into the room. When they do, have them write all of the things that they associate with witches. Early Stage 1 students might have to tell a teacher or partner.
  2. Focus on the idea of witches creating spells. Ask students: What is a spell? Draw attention to the fact that a spell is really just like a recipe. What sort of text is that (procedural)?
  3. Hand out Attachment 15.1. Ask students to fill out the Venn diagram, illustrating the differences and similarities between a spell and a recipe. Pair students in groups.
  4. Play No Good Deed from Wicked and ask students to just listen the first time. Explain that this is a mixture of a spell and a song which Elphaba, the Wicked Witch of the West, sings in Wicked when she is trying to save her boyfriend who has been hurt. By the end of the song, she swears that she will no longer do any good deeds because they always lead to trouble.
  5. Hand out Attachment 15.2. Read through the lyrics with the class.
  6. Discuss the strange words that are used at different points of the song. What sort of words are these (nonsense)? Why are they used here?
  7. The lyrics start with a spell (first three paragraphs). Discuss how the actress playing Elphaba used her body language and facial expressions to convey the message of the song. What is it that she wants from this spell? Play the song again, but this time, let the students sing along.
  8. Ask the students: If you could write a spell, to either get something or stop something from happening, what would it be? Discuss some ideas.
  9. Discuss the use of verbs and adverbs in procedural texts. Each step must tell you what to do. A very good procedural text will tell you how to do it (adverbs). On the board do some examples with the class of ‘steps’ in a spell, including both verbs and adverbs.
  10. Group the students in mixed ability pairs. Ensure that the younger students still get to contribute ideas, words, steps in this task. They are to write their own spell, to help them either get something or stop something from happening. They have to include an introduction, explaining the spell, an ingredient/equipment list, the method, and a final sentence. Each group is to spend time working on a draft, before presenting their spell to the teacher. They must circle the verbs in their spell and underline any adverbs.
  11. Each pair will publish their ‘spell’ using a Word document or Publisher. They should include an interesting border, possibly an illustration and a heading.

Reflection

Once the pairs have created their ‘spell’, they are to read the finished product to the class, using their voices and faces to express some of the meaning.

Activity 16 – Summon some courage

Learning intention

Students will understand that courage only comes as a result of overcoming fear. Students will be able to recall some facts about people who have demonstrated courage. Students will be able to talk about their own experiences with courage.

Success criteria

Completed worksheets explaining a situation where they showed courage, and a situation where they wished they had more courage. Definitions of courage. Extension: Facts about Malala Yousafzai.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • ENe-2A: Composes simple texts to convey an idea or message.
  • ENe-11D: Responds to and composes simple texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences.
  • PDe-9: Practises self-management skills in familiar and unfamiliar scenarios.

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • EN1-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers.
  • EN1-11D: Responds to and composes a range of texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences.
  • PD1-9: Demonstrates self-management skills in taking responsibility for their own actions.

Stage 2

  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.
  • EN2-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a range of texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and language.
  • EN2-11D: Responds to and composes a range of texts that express viewpoints of the world similar to and different from their own.
  • HT2-1: Identifies celebrations and commemorations of significance in Australia and the world.
  • PD2-9: Demonstrates self-management skills to respond to their own and others’ actions.

Stage 3

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.
  • EN3-8D: Identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world, including aspects of culture, are represented in texts.
  • HT3-2: Describes and explains different experiences of people living in Australia over time.
  • HT3-4: Describes and explains the struggles for rights and freedoms in Australia, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
  • PD3-9: Applies and adapts self-management skills to respond to personal and group situations.

Resources

Approximate time

80 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Have the word ‘courage’ written on the board when students walk in class. Ask them to write it into their books and then write down everything that they can think of to do with courage. Work with the Early Stage 1 students to do this together. Discuss some of their answers.
  2. Each student then writes one sentence, beginning with: Courage is ….
  3. Each student reads their sentence to the class. Discuss as a group, whether the other students agree or disagree.
  4. Write the following sentence on the board: ‘People with courage aren’t scared.’ Ask students to think about this for a minute. Do they agree or disagree? Ask the students who agree to stand on one side of the room and those that disagree to stand on the other side of the room. Those who are not sure yet can stand in the middle.
  5. Starting with the youngest students, have them explain, one at a time, why they chose that answer. If students find that their own thoughts on the matter have changed at all, they can start moving slightly towards the side of the room that they are agreeing with, after each student answers. Allow every student to explain their reasoning.
  6. Discuss the idea that you cannot have courage without some fear. Courage is what makes us push through the fear and do it anyway. Reflect on the activity about bullying. Does it take courage to stand up to a bully? Would there be fear?
  7. Ask the class to brainstorm a list of people that they know of who have shown courage. Write their suggestions on the board. If time allows, you could allow students to research one of these courageous people.
  8. Look back at the brainstorm. Highlight any people that they might have mentioned from the military. Discuss the importance of courage in our military forces. Ask if students know how we honour the courage of the military (medals, awards, Anzac Day and Remembrance Day). Discuss the upcoming Remembrance Day and what it stands for.
  9. Watch An Indigenous Australian war hero of WW1 about a World War 1 veteran who was awarded a medal for courage and discuss his story afterwards. Why would this hero not have been celebrated when he came home? How can we continue to recognise the courage of our military?
  10. Hand out Attachments 16.1 to 16.3 to the appropriate stage groups. Ask students to complete the two sections about a time that they showed courage and a time that they wished they had more courage. Share some of these if students are happy to.
  11. Reflect on the story of The Wizard of Oz. Who was seeking courage? Watch The Wizard of Oz – If I Only Had the Nerve scene as a reminder. How did Lion develop courage throughout the story?

Reflection

  1. Ask students what they already know about Malala Yousafzai, a young lady who has shown great courage. Show Women’s History: Malala Yousafzai, and have students write down reasons why she had courage. Ask older students to write more detailed reasons, for example, Early Stage 1 – one reason, Stage 1 – two reasons, and so on.
  2. Read the class a picture book in which a character demonstrates great courage, for example, Simpson and his Donkey or Flood.

Activity 17 – Show a little tenderness

Learning intention

Students will analyse a quote about love from the text and see how it relates to their own lives. Students will know how to write a letter. Students will demonstrate movements to reflect a character.

Success criteria

Students will move like the Tin Man and describe what they had to do to their bodies. Students will write letters to those that they love following a proper letter format.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • ENe-2A: Composes simple texts to convey an idea or message.
  • ENe-3A: Produces most lower case and upper case letters and uses digital technologies to construct texts.
  • ENe-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, simple ideas and the basic features of texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • DAES1.2: Explores movement in response to a stimulus to express ideas, feelings or moods.
  • PDe-3: Communicates ways to be caring, inclusive and respectful of others.
  • PDe-10: Uses interpersonal skills to effectively interact with others.

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • EN1-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a small range of simple texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers and viewers.
  • EN1-3A: Composes texts using letters of consistent size and slope and uses digital technologies.
  • EN1-10C: Thinks imaginatively and creatively about familiar topics, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • DAS1.2: Explores and selects movement using the elements of dance to make dance express ideas, feelings or moods.
  • PD1-3: Recognises and describes the qualities that enhance inclusive and respectful relationships.
  • PD1-10: Describes and practises interpersonal skills to promote inclusion to make themselves and others feel they belong.

Stage 2

  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.
  • EN2-2A: Plans, composes and reviews a range of texts that are more demanding in terms of topic, audience and language.
  • EN2-3A: Uses effective handwriting and publishes texts using digital technologies.
  • EN2-10C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively and interpretively about information, ideas and texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • DAS2.2: Explores, selects and combines movement using the elements of dance to communicate ideas, feelings or moods.
  • PD2-3: Explains how empathy, inclusion and respect can positively influence relationships.
  • PD2-10: Demonstrates a range of interpersonal skills that build and enhance relationships and promote inclusion in various situations.

Stage 3

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.
  • EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.
  • DAS3.2: Explores, selects, organises and refines movement using the elements of dance to communicate intent.
  • PD3-3: Evaluates the impact of empathy, inclusion and respect on themselves and others.
  • PD3-10: Selects and uses interpersonal skills to interact respectfully with others to promote inclusion and build connections.

Resources

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. As the students walk into the classroom, have an image of the Tin Man from the 1939 movie on the board. Discuss what students think about this character. What does he want? What is he like?
  2. Play The Wizard of Oz – Tin Man’s dance scene. Discuss the sort of movements that the Tin Man used. Why? Ask students to move around the room in a similar way. Have them comment on what they had to do to their bodies when moving.
  3. Write on the board one of the most famous quotes from the movie about love: ‘A heart is not judged by how much you love; but by how much you are loved by others.’ (This is originally from the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum). Discuss what that means. Ask Stage 3 students to reflect on how the filmmakers showed this quote from the book in visual ways (the way that the other characters look at him and react to him, his growing confidence).
  4. Ask students to draw a love heart on their page. Around it, they are to write all of the different people who love them (parents, teachers, friends, and so on). Discuss some of the answers.
  5. Ask students how they let other people know that they love them (cuddles, telling them, gifts). Why is this important to do?
  6. Each student is to write a letter to somebody that they love. They must follow a standard letter format (demonstrate that to the class). Younger students can include an illustration in their letter. Older students are to include the quote that was used earlier in the activity. They should reference what they have learnt about love in this activity and unit. Stage 3 students should include a reflection on what the story of The Wizard of Oz has taught them.
  7. Students write draft letters in their books, which are edited together with the teacher. A published copy is written on a nice sheet of writing paper, in their neatest handwriting.

Reflection

Some students might like to share their letters out loud with the class. 

Activity 18 – Believe in yourself

Learning intention

Students will understand the importance of self-belief and how to develop it. Students will create their own musical interpretation of lyrics in groups.

Success criteria

Self-belief inventory with something in each box. A musical performance from each group that reflects the lyrics of the song.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • MUSES1.2: Creates own rhymes, games, songs and simple compositions.
  • PDe-1: Identifies who they are and how people grow and change.
  • PDe-2: Identifies people and demonstrates protective strategies that help keep themselves healthy, resilient and safe.

Stage 1

  • MUS1.2: Explores, creates, selects and organises sound in simple structures.
  • PD1-1: Describes the qualities and characteristics that make them similar and different to others.
  • PD1-2: Recognises and describes strategies people can use to feel comfortable, resilient and safe in situations.

Stage 2

  • MUS2.2: Improvises musical phrases, organises sounds and explains reasons for choices.
  • PD2-1: Explores strategies to manage physical, social and emotional change.
  • PD2-2: Explains and uses strategies to develop resilience and to make them feel comfortable and safe.

Stage 3

  • MUS3.2: Improvises, experiments, selects, combines and orders sound using musical concepts.
  • PD3-1: identifies and applies strengths and strategies to manage life changes and transitions.
  • PD3-2: Investigates information, community resources and strategies to demonstrate resilience and seek help for themselves and others.

Resources

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Have an image of the Scarecrow from the 1939 movie on the board when students enter. Ask them what it was that the Scarecrow was really looking for (a brain). Have students talk to a partner to discuss whether he was really missing a brain. If not, what was it that he was really missing (self-belief)?
  2. Hand out Attachment 18.1. Read through and complete one about yourself on the board, to demonstrate how it is to be done. Ask students to be honest about themselves. Allow students time to complete their worksheet. You will need to possibly scribe for younger students.
  3. Discuss some of the answers that students came up with. Focus on the idea that we all have areas that we would like to improve on, or are not good at, but everybody has things that they are good at. When we are feeling down about ourselves, we need to focus on what is good about us too.
  4. Discuss the Scarecrow. What are some of the things that he was really good at? What were some areas that he needed to work on? What were those times when he demonstrated intelligence, even though he thought he didn’t have any?
  5. Hand out Attachment 18.2. Explain that this is a song sung by Dorothy in The Wiz. Read through the lyrics together. Talk about the meaning of the song.
  6. Split students into mixed ability groups. Each group is to create their own song, using the lyrics of the song. Do not play the original for them yet. The students can use any tempo or rhythm. They may use some instruments if you have them or they can improvise some instruments. Give them time to come up with their own version of the song.
  7. Get all of the groups back together and have each group perform their version of the song. Discuss the choices that they made and why. Discuss how their interpretation matched the words of the song.
  8. Play Believe in Yourself from The Wiz. Discuss how it is similar or different to the versions that the students created.

Reflection

As the students leave, ask them to finish this sentence: ‘The best thing about me is ….’

Activity 19 – Set some goals

Learning intention

Students will learn how to set a SMART goal and discuss strategies for overcoming obstacles. Students will understand the use of goal setting and obstacles in The Wizard of Oz.

Success criteria

SMART goals for each student. Ideas for how to overcome obstacles.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • ENe-1A: Communicates with peers and known adults in informal and guided activities demonstrating emerging skills of group interaction.
  • MUES1.4: Listens to and responds to music.
  • PDe-9: Practices self-management skills in familiar and unfamiliar scenarios.

Stage 1

  • EN1-1A: Communicates with a range of people in informal and guided activities demonstrating interaction skills and considers how own communication is adjusted in different situations.
  • MUS1.4: Responds to a range of music, expressing likes and dislikes and the reasons for these choices.
  • PD1-9: Demonstrates self-management skills in taking responsibility for their own actions.

Stage 2

  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.
  • PD2-9: Demonstrates self-management skills to respond to their own and others’ actions.

Stage 3

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • PD3-9: Applies and adapts self-management skills to respond to personal and group situations.

Resources

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Display an image of Dorothy from the 1939 movie on the board as the students walk in. Ask them: What was it that Dorothy really wanted (to go home)?
  2. Dorothy spent the whole movie trying to achieve her goal. Hand out Attachment 19.1. Ask students to draw a picture of Dorothy in the bottom left-hand corner of the page. Ask students to draw a picture of Dorothy’s home in the top right-hand corner of the page. The path is the yellow brick road. Students should colour it yellow. Older students should add a brick pattern to the path.
  3. Ask students if Dorothy had an easy path to get home. Did problems come up along the way? What were they? Have them write or draw them beside the path.
  4. Ask students why they think Dorothy was successful in getting to her goal (help from friends, determined, took it one step at a time). Discuss how we all need to use these skills to help us get to our goals. It is rare that you will make it to your goal without some troubles along the way.
  5. Ask students to think of one goal – something that they really wanted to achieve this year. They are to share their goal with a partner. Hand out Attachment 19.2. Watch Setting SMART Goals – How to Properly Set a Goal.
  6. Pair an older student with a younger student. They each have to fill out their worksheet (the older student to help the younger one) and turn their wish into a SMART goal.
  7. Share these goals with the class. As each student shares their goal, the class comes up with one possible obstacle that might get in the way. The class can work together to work out how they might overcome that obstacle. They write it on their worksheet.

Reflection

In Wicked, Elphaba (the Wicked Witch of the West) also has goals. She wants to work with the Wizard but is facing many obstacles, including bullying at school. She is determined though. Her signature song is all about overcoming her obstacles and achieving her dream. Watch Defying Gravity – Schools Spectacular 2016. Discuss what students thought about the performance.

Activity 20 – Stronger together

Learning intention

Students will recognise the individual skills and talents of each member of the class. Students will gather and analyse data and create column graphs.

Success criteria

Accurate tally marking and column graphs. Accurate analysis of data. Students are able to share something special about every member of the class.

Syllabus outcomes

Early Stage 1

  • MAe-1WM: Describes mathematical situations using everyday language, actions, materials and informal recordings.
  • MAe-17SP: Represents data and interprets data displays made from objects.
  • PDe-3: Communicates ways to be caring, inclusive and respectful of others.

Stage 1

  • MA1-1WM: Describes mathematical situations and methods using everyday and some mathematical language, actions, materials, diagrams and symbols.
  • MA1-17SP: Gathers and organises data, displays data in lists, tables and picture graphs and interprets the results.
  • PD1-3: Recognises and describes the qualities that enhance inclusive and respectful relationships.

Stage 2

  • MA2-1WM: Uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent mathematical ideas.
  • MA2-18SP: Selects appropriate methods to collect data and constructs, compares, interprets and evaluates data displays, including tables, picture graphs and column graphs.
  • PD2-3: Explains how empathy, inclusion and respect can positively influence relationships.

Stage 3

  • MA3-1WM: Describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some conventions.
  • MA3-18SP: Uses appropriate methods to collect data and constructs, interprets and evaluates data displays, including dot plots, line graphs and two-way tables.
  • PD3-3: Evaluates the impact of empathy, inclusion and respect on themselves and others.

Resources

Approximate time

75 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Display an image of the four main characters from The Wizard of Oz (1939 movie) on the board as students walk in. Review the goals or wishes that each of the characters had.
  2. Ask students to vote for their favourite of the four characters. Draw a tally sheet on the board and have a student keep tally marks of the results. Mark the Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 students’ votes in one colour and the Stage 2 and Stage 3 students in a different colour (or use gender if there are not enough students in one of those groups).
  3. Ask Stage 2 students to create a column graph of the results in their books. Ask Stage 3 students to create a two-column graph of the results, showing the results of infant and primary votes (or gender). Work with the Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 students to create a column graph on the board together. All students must include a title and axis titles.
  4. As a class, discuss the results. Was there anything unusual or unpredicted in the results? Was there a noticeable difference between primary and infant votes (or gender)? Ask all students to note three facts that they can tell from their graph, for example, the Lion is the least favourite character. The teacher should work with the Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 students to complete this task. Discuss these facts.
  5. Discuss the fact that all four main characters were very different, with their own set of skills. In the story, they needed all of their skills to be able to achieve their goal.
  6. Write the following sentence on the board: ‘We are more powerful when we work together’.
  7. Ask students to split into groups to discuss this idea. They are to find an example from home and an example from school when they had to work together to achieve something that they couldn’t achieve on their own. Discuss these as a class.
  8. Ask students if they think that would be the same for the people in Schools Spectacular. Brainstorm as a class all of the different roles and skills that you need to put on a show like that (designers, lighting, musicians, dancers, advertisers, and so on).
  9. We all learn from each other. Give the students a list of all of the students in the class and adults who work or volunteer in the school. Ask them to think about what they have learnt from each of those people. For example, Josie taught me to be kind, Mr Summers taught me that old people can still have fun, and so on. Discuss the fact that your class is super strong because they rely on each other. Just like Dorothy and her friends, they can achieve big goals if they use each other’s skills.
  10. Explain that this video is of a song called For Good from the musical Wicked. It is about how Glinda the Good and Elphaba have both become better people because they knew each other. Watch For Good from Wicked.

Reflection

Each student talks about one other student in the class, starting with this phrase: ‘Because of _____________ I have been changed for the better and the reason is …’ The students then add the idea that they wrote next to that person’s name. Be sure that all students get spoken about.

Note: For Good would be a fantastic song to learn as a class for an assembly item.

Activity 21 – Schools Spectacular – Here we come!

Learning intention

Students will understand what Schools Spectacular is and know what to watch for in The Wizard of Oz segment.

Resources

Approximate time

15 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Ask if any students have attended a previous Schools Spectacular performance. Are there any that haven’t? Those who have attended can tell the class what it is all about.
  2. Watch the Schools Spectacular 2019 promo video. Discuss with students what they think.
  3. Explain that there will be a segment in the show all about The Wizard of Oz and its adaptations. Explain that you want them to pay particular attention to the songs and dances and which characters they can identify from the different adaptations that they have studied in this unit.

Reflection

Students tell a partner what they are most looking forward to seeing at Schools Spectacular.

Activity 22 – Schools Spectacular – STARS!

Learning intention

Students will respond to what they saw at Schools Spectacular and the characters from The Wizard of Oz that they recognised.

Resources

  • The televised edition of the Schools Spectacular 2019 performance if unable to attend in person.

Approximate time

15 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Discuss as a class, their favourite things about Schools Spectacular 2019. Would they watch it again? Would they try out to be a part of the show in 2020?
  2. Focus on The Wizard of Oz segment. What happened during this part of the show? Did the students recognise any of the songs from their unit of work?
  3. Discuss the different characters that they saw from the different adaptations of the story. Were they portrayed in a way that they expected? How did the different adaptations tie together in the segment?

Reflection

Ask students what their favourite part of this unit has been.

Find out more about The Arts Unit Digital Engagement

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