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>> Back to SpecEd 2018 – Unit 3 – Game on!

Syllabus outcomes for this unit

Select the subject to show the list of outcomes.

English

EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.

EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.

EN3-3A: Uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies.

EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies.

EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.

EN3-8D: Identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world, including aspects of culture, are represented in texts.

EN3-9E: Recognises, reflects on and assesses their strengths as a learner.

Mathematics

MA3-1WM: Describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some conventions.

MA3-2WM: Selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies, including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking investigations.

MA3-18SP: Uses appropriate methods to collect data and constructs, interprets and evaluates data displays, including dot plots, line graphs and two-way tables.

MA3-9MG: Selects and uses the appropriate unit and device to measure lengths and distances, calculates perimeters, and converts between units of length.

MA3-10MG: Selects and uses the appropriate unit to calculate areas, including areas of squares, rectangles and triangles.

MA3-15MG: Manipulates, classifies and draws two-dimensional shapes, including equilateral, isosceles and scalene triangles, and describes their properties.

Creative arts

VAS3.2: Makes artworks for different audiences assembling materials in a variety of ways.

MUS3.3: Notates and discusses own work and the work of others.

MUS3.4: Identifies the use of musical concepts and symbols in a range of musical styles.

Science and technology

ST3-2VA: Demonstrates a willingness to engage responsibly with local, national and global issues relevant to their lives, and to shaping sustainable futures.

ST3-3VA: Develops informed attitudes about the current and future use and influence of science and technology based on reason.

ST3-5WT: Plans and implements a design process, selecting a range of tools, equipment, materials and techniques to produce solutions that address the design criteria and identified constraints.

ST3-13MW: Describes how the properties of materials determine their use for specific purposes.

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE)

V4: Increasingly accepts responsibility for personal and community health.

INS3.3: Acts in ways that enhance the contribution of self and others in a range of cooperative situations.

GSS3.8: Applies movement skills in games and sports that require communication, cooperation, decision making and observation of rules.

SLS3.13: Describes safe practices that are appropriate to a range of situations and environments.

Vocabulary words

Teaching and learning activities

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In order to print out any of the following activities, please select the ‘Print this page’ button at the bottom of this page.

Activity 1 – Schools Spectacular 2018 – The Greatest!

Learning intention

Students will learn what Schools Spectacular is all about and why they are doing this unit of work on video games.

Resources

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan 

  1. Show the students the first four minutes of Medley of cartoon themes (YouTube). Tell them that this is a segment from Schools Spectacular 2015. Draw attention to the different elements – soloists, dancers, large wearable puppets.
  2. Brainstorm how the puppets might be made and why some characters would have been chosen to be presented as puppets.
  3. Watch John Deacon – Schools Spectacular 2013 (YouTube) followed by SpecTalk 2017 (YouTube). SpecTalk will start at 9 minutes and 20 seconds.
  4. Explain that there are always puppets involved in Schools Spectacular and that this year the puppets will be involved in a segment on video games. The video games segment is going to be the basis of this unit of work on video games.
  5. Brainstorm what sorts of puppets we might see in Schools Spectacular 2018 ‘The Greatest’ video games segment.
  6. Ask students to draw the video game puppets they think we might see or the ones they would like to see.

Reflection

Discuss what the students are most looking forward to in this unit of work.

Activity 2 – What game is that?

Learning intention

Students will write descriptions of video games.

Success criteria

Students will write a description of a video game, with at least three adjectives and at least three ‘precise’ words.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologiess.

Resources

  • Attachment 2.1 – Minecraft description

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Tell the students a story about your favourite video game when you were growing up, or more recently. How did playing it make you feel? What was your favourite thing about it? Discuss with the students: Why do we love playing video games? What makes a good video game?
  2. As a class, decide on some broad categories of games. Examples include first person shooter (FPS), puzzle games, building games, adventure games, sports games, simulation games. Write these up on the board.
  3. Explain that you are going to ask each student to write a description of one of their favourite video games, but with a twist! They are not allowed to name the game, and need to use adjectives and ‘precise’ words to create an image in the listener’s head. Explain what a ‘precise’ word is and what an adjective is.
  4. Demonstrate with the description of Minecraft in Attachment 2.1. Students are not allowed to call out what game it is until you have finished. When you have finished reading, students can try to guess what the game is. They can also determine in which broad category (from step 2) you would place this game. Ask students to also find the adjectives and precise words in the description.
  5. Students are now to write their own short descriptions of their favourite video games without naming them, including at least three adjectives and three precise words.

Reflection

Discuss which category of games was most often written about.  Do we think that this is our favourite type. How could we find that out? Lead into the next activity on surveys.

Activity 3 – Survey time

Learning intention

Students will conduct surveys, collecting and representing data.

Success criteria

Students will create a graph which accurately reflects data collected in their survey.

Syllabus outcomes

  • MA3-1WM: Describes and represents mathematical situations in a variety of ways using mathematical terminology and some conventions.
  • MA3-18SP: Uses appropriate methods to collect data and constructs, interprets and evaluates data displays, including dot plots, line graphs and two-way tables.

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Review the categories from the previous activity. What sort of information did you gather from the descriptions and categorisation? What other information would you like to find out about the class and video games?
  2. Students come up with questions to investigate, for example: What is your favourite video game? How many hours a day do you game? What platform do you play on? Do you like playing video games? Do you usually play alone or with friends?
  3. Divide students into groups, with each one choosing one question to investigate.
  4. Explain the task to students. They are to create a survey about their investigation question. They must decide whether there will be limited answers to choose from or open-ended. They will need to collect their results and then decide what sort of graph would be best to represent their data.
  5. Review types of graphs with students (line, column, pie, dot plot).
  6. Discuss: When would it be useful to have a double column graph? Perhaps they could see what the results of the survey are for boys and girls, and represent it using a double column graph.Explain that students will need to have a label for their graph, as well as labels for the horizontal axis and the vertical axis.
  7. Explain that they will need to decide whether to use one-to-one correspondence or have a scale on their graph.
  8. Groups are to come up with their question and parameters for answers.
  9. Groups conduct surveys on each other, tabulate their results and create graphs to represent their data.

Reflection

Groups share their data and graphs with the class.

Activity 4 – Video game history

Learning intention

Students write an information report about the history of video games.

Success criteria

Students write a one page information report, with subheadings, past tense and specific facts.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.
  • EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies.

Resources

  • Attachment 4.1 – Video game history – fact cards
  • Attachment 4.2 – Information report – structure
  • BTN story: Video Games

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Ask students if they know what the very first computer game was. Discuss some classic games. Watch the BTN story Video Games and discuss as a class. How have games changed? Would you have enjoyed playing the classic games?
  2. Split students into small groups. Explain that each group will be given a set of fact cards (see Attachment 4.1) related to video game history. Each group is to read the cards and try to place them in chronological order on a piece of paper, desk or wall.
  3. After students have had time to make their timeline, reveal the correct years to go with each fact card. Students write the years on their cards. Groups then correct any incorrectly placed cards.
  4. Explain that the students are going to write an information report about the history of video games, using the information that they have on the fact cards. Review the structure of an information report. Hand out and read Attachment 4.2.
  5. Students then use the information that they have to write an information report about the history of video games.

Reflection

Discussion: If you could play one game from the historical timeline, which would it be and why?

Activity 5 – 'Pinball Wizard'

Learning intention

Students will be able to list the key features of a pinball machine, using specific vocabulary.

Success criteria

Students identify nine subject-specific words related to pinball machines.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies.

Resources

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Ask students whether they have ever played a pinball machine. Where was it? Did they enjoy it? How was it different to a video game?
  2. Hand out Attachment 5.1 and read through as a class.
  3. Students to answer the two questions at the bottom of the fact sheet and discuss.
  4. Hand out Attachment 5.2. Read through the information under the heading ‘Specific words’ and talk about what ‘specific’ words are.
  5. Read through the lyrics together. Listen to the song, Pinball Wizard by The Who (YouTube).
  6. Students to find nine examples of ‘specific’ words in the lyrics of 'Pinball Wizard'.

Reflection

Brainstorm with the class the features that all pinball machines need to have.

Activity 6 – Build a pinball machine – ASSESSMENT

Learning intention

Students will work cooperatively and implement a design process.

Success criteria

Students work in cooperative groups to design and make a pinball machine which includes examples of forces.

Syllabus outcomes

  • ST3-5WT: Plans and implements a design process, selecting a range of tools, equipment, materials and techniques to produce solutions that address the design criteria and identified constraints.
  • ST3-13MW: Describes how the properties of materials determine their use for specific purposes.
  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.

Resources

  • Attachment 6.1 – The science behind pinball machines
  • Attachment 6.2 – Build your pinball machine
  • Attachment 6.3 – Pinball machine – rubric
  • Recycled materials, cardboard boxes, marbles, springs, tape, scissors, elastic bands, craft sticks, paper clips, string, straws, shoe boxes, pizza boxes, A3 paper for design drawing, egg cartons, bottle tops, pipe cleaners, aluminium foil, buttons.

Approximate time

90 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Review the previous activity and what all pinball machines have in common.
  2. Discuss: What is it that makes the ball keep moving through the machine? Read through Attachment 6.1 as a class and discuss.
  3. Introduce the challenge. In groups, students will build their own pinball machines that launch a ball and send it through an obstacle course.
  4. Hand out Attachment 6.2 and 6.3, explaining what is involved in this design task.
  5. Give students time to create their pinball machine, using recycled and craft materials.
  6. You could increase the challenge, by asking students to add flippers.
  7. If the ball moves too quickly through obstacles, adjust the tilt of the machine.
  8. When completed, each group does a presentation about their design process and their finished product.

Reflection

Discuss how students would improve their pinball machines, if they had extra materials and more time.

Activity 7 – Pac-Man live

Learning intention

Students use movement skills and cooperation to play the Pac-Man game.

Success criteria

Students work cooperatively and follow game rules.

Syllabus outcomes

  • INS3.3: Acts in ways that enhance the contribution of self and others in a range of cooperative situations.
  • GSS3.8: Applies movement skills in games and sports that require communication, cooperation, decision making & observation of rules.
  • EN2-1A: Communicates in a range of informal and formal contexts by adopting a range of roles in group, classroom, school and community contexts.

Resources

  • An outdoor space with lots of lines marked on the ground.

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. This activity should be played in a gymnasium or on a tennis or basketball court with lots of lines marked on the ground.
  2. Ask students whether anybody has ever played Pac-Man. Discuss the basic premise of the game.
  3. Explain that today, students are going to be playing Pac-Man, in real life.
  4. Split the class into three even groups – Pac-Man, ghosts and fruit.
  5. The ‘fruit’ group are to be placed randomly around the play area and sit next to one of the lines. The ‘ghost’ group will position themselves around the play area (not too close to the start position) on the lines. The ‘Pac-Man’ group will sit to the side of the playing area, as only one person will be Pac-Man at a time.
  6. During the game, Pac-Man starts at one end of the space. The goal is to get to the other end of the space, following the lines marked on the ground. They must get to the other side without being tagged by a ‘ghost’.
  7. If the Pac-Man touches one of the pieces of ‘fruit’ on the head, they can now eliminate any ‘ghosts’ for the next 5 seconds. The rest of the students waiting in the Pac-Man group can count loudly to 5 to signal this time. If Pac-Man can tag a ghost, they now have to sit down on the line and they become a ‘barrier’, which no player can pass.
  8. All players can only move on the lines. They cannot jump from one line to another. It is up to the teacher to decide if students have to walk or if they can run.
  9. If the Pac-Man is caught by a ‘ghost’, their turn is finished. Swap students into the role of Pac-Man. Once all students in the Pac-Man group have had a turn, swap the groups around until all students have had a turn.

Reflection

Discuss: What sort of strategies did you need to have, to make it through the Pac-Man game?

Activity 8 – Tetris tessellations

Learning intention

Students will learn about tessellations, using translation, rotation and reflection to create a pattern on grid paper.

Success criteria

Students will create a tessellated pattern, using Tetris shapes on grid paper.

Syllabus outcomes

  • MA3-2WM: Selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies, including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking investigations.
  • MA3-15MG: Manipulates, classifies and draws two-dimensional shapes, including equilateral, isosceles and scalene triangles, and describes their properties.

Resources

  • Tetris theme music 
  • Attachment 8.1 – Tetris – fact sheet
  • Attachment 8.2 – Tessellating tetrominoes
  • Grid paper

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Play the Tetris theme music as students walk into the room. Does anybody recognise the tune? What game is this from?
  2. Hand out Attachment 8.1 and read through with students, answering the questions on the bottom of the page.
  3. Hand out Attachment 8.2. Review tessellation and how to translate, rotate and reflect shapes. Students complete the activity, creating tessellations with the Tetris shapes.

Reflection

Discuss: Was this activity difficult or easy? What made it so? We do know that all of these shapes tessellate. What other shapes tessellate well?

Activity 9 – Tetris multiplication

Learning intention

Students will use multiplication and addition skills to work out the area and perimeter of shapes.

Success criteria

Students will be able to work out the area and perimeter of shapes drawn on grid paper.

Syllabus outcomes

  • MA3-2WM: Selects and applies appropriate problem-solving strategies, including the use of digital technologies, in undertaking investigations.
  • MA3-9MG: Selects and uses appropriate unit and device to measure lengths and distances, calculates perimeters, and converts between units of length.
  • MA3-10MG: Selects and uses the appropriate unit to calculate areas, including areas of squares, rectangles and triangles.

Resources

  • Attachment 9.1 – Tetris Multiplication
  • Grid paper

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Review the previous activity and tessellation. Point out that in that activity, the students only used tetrominoes (shapes made of four squares).
  2. Explain that they will be using grid paper again, creating patterns with no gaps, but this time they will also be using their multiplication and measurement skills.
  3. Put the students in pairs for this game, with one piece of grid paper, two different coloured pencils and a pair of dice.
  4. Demonstrate the game. Each player chooses a coloured pencil that they will use in the game. Players take turns rolling the dice. They multiply the numbers that they roll to give them the area for the shape that they have to draw. Students draw a shape on the grid paper, with an area of the number that they rolled. Students colour their shape. Inside, they write the multiplication sum and the area of the shape. They then work out the perimeter of the shape and write that inside as well (see Attachment 9.1). The students then swap over. The aim of the game is to tessellate your drawn shapes so that there are no gaps. The game ends when players run out of room to draw.
  5. Students complete the game.

Reflection

Discuss what they enjoyed or found difficult about the game.

Activity 10 – Pokémon

Learning intention

Students will write powerful descriptions of characters, using adjectives and adverbs. Students will draw detailed images of created characters.

Success criteria

Students will write a description of a self-drawn character, including three powerful adjectives and three adverbs. Students will provide feedback to peers and use feedback to refine their work.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-6B: Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and vocabulary to respond to and compose clear and cohesive texts in different media and technologies.
  • EN3-9E: Recognises, reflects on and assesses their strengths as a learner.
  • VAS3.2: Makes artworks for different audiences assembling materials in a variety of ways.

Resources

  • Attachment 10.1 – Pokémon cards explained
  • Attachment 10.2 – Charmander description
  • Attachment 10.3 – Character card – template (two sets for each student)
  • A set of Pokémon cards (either one per student or per group)

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Before the students come into the classroom, place a Pokémon card on each table.
  2. When students come in, they will be excited to see the Pokémon cards and will want to talk about them. Discuss what they are and what they are used for (see Attachment 10.1).
  3. Brainstorm what sort of information is found on a Pokémon character card. Focus on the rarity of the card, image of the character, height and weight, description of the character and what it can do.
  4. Explain that today, the students are going to create their own character trading cards. Their cards are going to focus on characters that the students will create themselves.
  5. Show Attachment 10.2 to the class and talk about the description that has been written about Charmander. Highlight any adjectives, verbs and adverbs.
  6. Students are to create their own character for our class trading card set. They must draw a detailed colour image of the character on one side of the card. On the other side, they must come up with an original and interesting name. They must write a three-sentence description of their character, including three powerful adjectives and three adverbs.
  7. Students swap their draft character cards with a partner. They provide feedback to each other, on their drawings and descriptions, providing the partner with at least two suggestions on how to improve their card.
  8. Students revise their original character card, based on the feedback from peers and create a final copy of their card using Attachment 10.3.
  9. You may wish to have students create two cards each if time permits.
  10. Collect cards and photocopy/laminate a class set for every student.

Reflection

Students discuss ways that the cards could be used to create a game.

Activity 11 – Spin our own story

Learning intention

Students will write a narrative, using the characters created in the previous activity as a stimulus.

Success criteria

Students write a narrative, with an orientation, complication and resolution, using at least three characters.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts.
  • EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.

Resources

  • The class set of character cards created in the previous activity.

Approximate time

120 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Hand out to the class set of laminated character cards from the previous activity. Give students time to read and discuss some of the characters there.
  2. Discuss some of the favourite characters. What makes them interesting? What makes them unique?
  3. Explain the task. Students are going to write a complete narrative, with orientation, complication and resolution, using at least three of the characters from the card set. Only one of the characters in the story can be one that they created themselves.
  4. Review the structure of a narrative on the board.
  5. Explain that students will have the cards as stimulus. They must use the name that was given to the character and use their strengths and weaknesses as part of the story. They will need to include some dialogue from each character.
  6. Brainstorm ideas for character combinations that would make for an interesting storyline.
  7. Give students time to draft, edit and publish their narratives.

Reflection

Students can choose one sentence from their own story, which helps to keep the reader engaged, to share with the class.

Activity 12 – Video game music as a genre

Learning intention

Students reflect on how music can set an atmosphere or mood.  Students consider whether video game music is a legitimate genre of music.

Success criteria

Students can explain how mood is created with music.  Students can write four arguments for or against the idea that video game music is a legitimate genre of music.

Syllabus outcomes

  • MUS3.3: Notates and discusses own work and the work of others.
  • MUS3.4: Identifies the use of musical concepts and symbols in a range of musical styles.
  • EN3-7C: Thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.

Resources

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. As the students walk into the classroom, have the Halo: Combat Evolved soundtrack (YouTube) playing. They may ask what it is. Ask if they have heard it before. Eventually tell them it is from the video game called Halo. Discuss what sort of mood or atmosphere it conveys.
  2. In a group, discuss what sort of mood or atmosphere is needed for different styles of video games.  How can music do this? Each group shares their ideas with the class.
  3. Discuss: Is video game music a legitimate genre – up there with classical, country, rock, et cetera? Read through Attachment 12.1.
  4. Write a heading on the board – Video game music is a legitimate genre of music.  Write two subheadings underneath – 'Agree' and 'Disagree'.
  5. Watch and listen to Games in Concert 2 – Tetris (YouTube).
  6. Whilst students are listening to the performance, they are given four sticky notes to write on. They are to write a sentence on each sticky note, detailing a reason for or against the argument that video game music is a legitimate genre of music.
  7. Students put their sticky notes under the appropriate heading – Agree or Disagree.

Reflection

Watch the Video Games Live – World of Warcraft – Invincible (YouTube) performance.

Activity 13 – Tempo in video game music

Learning intention

Students will learn about tempo, including the official terms, and how it is used in video game music to create mood and atmosphere.

Success criteria

Students can estimate the tempo of a piece of music and describe the mood that is created by the music and what sort of game it would work well in.

Syllabus outcomes

  • MUS3.3: Notates and discusses own work and the work of others.
  • MUS3.4: Identifies the use of musical concepts and symbols in a range of musical styles.

Resources

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Review the previous activity, focusing on the links between video game music and classical music and on how the music sets the atmosphere for the game.
  2. Explain that in this activity, students will be listening to four different pieces of music and analysing it for the sounds that they hear, the mood that is created and the tempo. Hand out Attachment 13.1. Read and discuss as a class.
  3. Hand out Attachment 13.2. Read through the first example as a class, explaining what the students need to do.
  4. Listen to some examples of video game music (you will not have to listen to the entire clip) and fill in the analysis sheet as you go.
  5. After each musical sample, stop and discuss student answers. Let them know what the BPM actually was and see who was close:
    • Pac-Man is 116 BPM (allegro)
    • Journey’s End is 71 BPM (andante moderato)
    • Super Mario Bros. is 93 (moderato)
    • Kreisler – Violin Concerto is allegro (we do not know the actual BPM.
  6. After discussing answers to the last piece (Kreisler – Violin Concerto), explain that it was not actually from a video game, but a piece of classical music written over 100 years ago. Is it that different from the other pieces of music that have been played over the past two activities? What sort of game could it be used for?

Reflection

Discuss: What future can you see for video game music?

Activity 14 – Videogame classification – ASSESSMENT

Learning intention

Students will write a discussion text, reflecting their understanding of the importance of video game classifications.

Success criteria

Students write a discussion text using the set structure, which includes four arguments and an introduction and conclusion.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-2A: Composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts
  • EN3-8D: Identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world, including aspects of culture, are represented in texts.
  • V4: Increasingly accepts responsibility for personal & community health
  • SLS3.13: Describes safe practices that are appropriate to a range of situations and environments.

Resources

  • Attachment 14.1 – Video game classification – fact sheet
  • Attachment 14.2 – What do you think?
  • Attachment 14.3 – Classification discussion – proforma
  • Attachment 14.4 – Classification discussion – rubric

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. When the students enter the room, have the image of the Australian classifications up on the board (Attachment 14.1). Discuss what they already know about these symbols.
  2. Read Attachment 14.1 together, discussing the different classifications.
  3. Split the class into small groups (4 to 5). In their groups, students are to discuss and write down their answers to the questions on Attachment 14.2.
  4. Choose one member of each group to share the answers to the questions in a whole class discussion.
  5. Explain the task – students are going to write a discussion text about the topic – Video game classification is a waste of time. Read through Attachments 14.3 and 14.4, so that students completely understand the task.
  6. Students write their discussion text individually.

Reflection

Discuss: Whose perspective was the hardest to write about – young children, teenagers, parents or teachers? Why do you think it was the hardest?

Activity 15 – Games for change

Learning intention

Students learn about a video game aimed at improving the world and then present information to the class.

Success criteria

Students engage with a video game making positive impacts on the world and present information clearly to the class.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • ST3-2VA: Demonstrate a willingness to engage responsibly with local, national and global issues relevant to their lives, and to shaping sustainable futures.

Resources

Approximate time

60 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Discussion: What is the purpose of video games? Why do we play them? What if there was another reason to play? What if you could make the world a better place, just by playing a video game?
  2. Play Games for Change: Making a social impact (YouTube).
  3. Discuss: What is the purpose of some of those games that you just saw?
  4. Explain that in this activity, students are going to investigate a game that has been created in order to make a positive change in the world.
  5. Separate class into pairs. Each pair will play a video game from Attachment 15.1 for 15 minutes and then will report back to the class about their game.
  6. Pairs tell the class about their game. What was it about? What positive change was the game trying to make in the world? Would you play the game again?

Reflection

Discuss: If you could create a game that would make a positive change in the world, what would it be about?

Activity 16 – Video games in the workplace

Learning intention

Students learn about the use of science and technology in real world applications related to job training.

Success criteria

Students can verbalise the benefits and drawbacks of job training in the form of a simulator video game.

Syllabus outcomes

  • ST3-3VA: Develops informed attitudes about the current and future use and influence of science and technology based on reason.

Resources

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Discuss with students what sort of video games adults play. Are they always games for fun? What about to help them with their job?
  2. Students list all of the jobs that they think use video games to help their employees.
  3. Explain that you are going to show a series of videos that show video games that are being used to help train people in their jobs. For each video, students are to answer the following questions:
    • What sort of job is this?
    • What is the player having to do in the video game?
    • How would this video game be helpful in the workplace?
  4. Discuss answers after each video (you do not have to show the entire video).
  5. Working in pairs, students come up with a list of other tasks or jobs that would benefit from a simulated game or virtual reality (VR) experience, to help people master.

Reflection

Discuss: Do you think that training in a video game is as good as training in the real world?

Activity 17 – Where to next?

Learning intention

Students use comprehension skills to read and interpret information about virtual reality gaming.

Success criteria

Students engage in discussion and answer a series of comprehension questions about virtual reality gaming.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-3A: Uses an integrated range of skills, strategies and knowledge to read, view and comprehend a wide range of texts in different media and technologies.
  • ST3-3VA: Develops informed attitudes about the current and future use and influence of science and technology based on reason.

Resources

  • Attachment 17.1 – Virtual reality gaming – fact sheet
  • Attachment 17.2 – Virtual reality gaming – comprehension questions
  • BTN story on Aurora College: Virtual classroom

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Discuss with students how far video games have come over the years. Where do they think that it is heading next? What will be the next big wave of video games?
  2. Hand out and read through Attachment 17.1. Students answer comprehension questions on Attachment 17.2.
  3. Discuss other uses for virtual reality, besides just gaming.
  4. Show the BTN story about Aurora College Virtual classroom, emphasising its use of virtual reality for lessons and downtime (coffee shop and quad). Ensure that students know that Aurora College is a part of the NSW Department of Education.

Reflection

Discuss: Would you like to attend Aurora College?  Discuss ways to apply for it in the NSW Department of Education.

Activity 18 – Design your own game – ASSESSMENT

Learning intention

Students will work in a small group to create a design document for a video game, focusing on setting, plot and character development.

Success criteria

Students will write descriptive passages about characters, draw detailed sketches of scenes, and use public speaking skills to convey information to a larger group.

Syllabus outcomes

  • EN3-1A: Communicates effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and language forms and features.
  • VAS3.2: Makes artworks for different audiences assembling materials in a variety of ways.
  • INS3.3: Acts in ways that enhance the contribution of self and others in a range of cooperative situations.

Resources

  • Attachment 18.1 – Design your own game – instructions
  • Attachment 18.2 – Design your own game – rubric

Approximate time

120 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Ask students whether they have ever thought about designing their own video game. Have they tried to do so in a computer program like Scratch or Game Maker?
  2. Explain that in this activity, students will work in small groups to come up with a design proposal for a new video game. Depending on time, available technology and teacher/student expertise, you may allow groups to actually make their game online. However, this is not necessary for this task.
  3. Using Attachment 18.1 and Attachment 18.2, students work in their groups on all elements of their game design.
  4. Once completed, each group presents their design document to the class, explaining how their game works and showing what it would look like.

Reflection

Discuss: Tell the class one thing you liked from somebody else’s design documents.

Activity 19 – Schools Spectacular, here we come!

Learning intention

Students will understand what Schools Spectacular is and know what to look for in the video games segment.

Resources

Approximate time

15 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Ask if any students have attended a previous School Spectacular. Are there any who haven’t? Those who have attended can tell the class what it is all about.
  2. Watch the Schools Spectacular promotional video and discuss with students what they think.
  3. Explain that there will be a segment in the show about video games that will include a lot of the music and characters from video games that they have been learning about during this unit of work.
  4. Explain that you want them to pay particular attention to the music. Can they recognise any songs? How does the music make them feel during the show? Can they determine what the tempo of any of the songs will be? What instruments can they hear playing in the orchestra during this segment.
  5. Explain that you will be doing one last activity after the show, reflecting on what they saw.

Activity 20 – Schools Spectacular – The Greatest!

Learning intention

Students will respond to what they saw at Schools Spectacular and what they recognised in the video games segment.

Approximate time

30 minutes

Activity plan

  1. Discuss as a class, their favourite things about Schools Spectacular 2018. Would they go again? Would they try out to be a part of the show in 2019?
  2. Focus on the video games segment. What happened during this part of the show?  Did the students recognise any of the music or games from their unit of work?
  3. Discuss the performers who were featured during this segment (focus on the orchestra and dancers). What sort of preparations would they have had to do before the show?
  4. As a class, list the songs that they heard during the video games segment. What tempo do they think those songs had? (You can google the BPM of each of the songs.) Why would the creative directors have picked these songs to feature in Schools Spectacular?

Reflection

Discuss: What was their favourite thing that they have done in this unit? What more would they like to know about video games?

Find out more about The Arts Unit Digital Engagement

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