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About 'Become'

'Become' was originally part of a larger work that was loosely composed for taiko, electric guitars, drum set, and electronic sounds. It was inspired by the thought of "becoming the other side of you". By challenging yourself, undertaking a difficult task, or putting yourself in extreme situations you can access or ‘become’ that other side.

View Attachment 1: 'Become' composer notes for more information.

To print out the following activities and attachments, please select the 'Print this page' button at the bottom of this page.

Syllabus outcomes

Outcomes
Description
4.1

performs in a range of musical styles demonstrating an understanding of musical concepts

5.1

performs repertoire with increasing levels of complexity in a range of musical styles demonstrating an understanding of the musical concepts

4.2

performs music using different forms of notation and different types of technology across a broad range of musical styles

5.2

performs repertoire in a range of styles and genres demonstrating interpretation of musical notation and the application of different types of technology

4.4

demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through exploring, experimenting, improvising, organising, arranging and composing

5.4

demonstrates an understanding of the musical concepts through improvising, arranging and composing in the styles or genres of music selected for study

4.7

demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through listening, observing, responding, discriminating, analysing, discussing and recording musical ideas

5.7

demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through the analysis, comparison, and critical discussion of music from different stylistic, social, cultural and historical contexts

4.8

demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through aural identification and discussion of the features of a range of repertoire

5.8

demonstrates an understanding of musical concepts through aural identification, discrimination, memorisation and notation in the music selected for study

4.9

demonstrates musical literacy through the use of notation, terminology, and the reading and interpreting of scores used in the music selected for study

5.9

demonstrates an understanding of musical literacy through the appropriate application of notation, terminology, and the interpretation and analysis of scores used in the music selected for study

4.12

demonstrates a developing confidence and willingness to engage in performing, composing and listening experiences

5.12

demonstrates a developing confidence and willingness to engage in performing, composing and listening experiences

Music 1 P2

observes, reads, interprets and discusses simple musical scores characteristic of topics studied

Music 1 P4

recognises and identifies the concepts of music and discusses their use in a variety of musical styles

Music 1 P6

observes and discusses concepts of music in works representative of the topics studied

Music 1 P10

demonstrates a willingness to participate in performance, composition, musicology and aural activities

Music 1 H2

reads, interprets, discusses and analyses simple musical scores that are characteristic of the topics studied

Music 1 H10

demonstrates a willingness to participate in performance, composition, musicology and aural activities

Music 2 P2

demonstrates an understanding of the concepts of music, by interpreting, analysing, discussing, creating and notating a variety of musical symbols characteristically used in the mandatory and additional topics

Music 2 P3

composes, improvises and analyses melodies and accompaniments for familiar sound sources in solo and/or small ensembles

Music 2 P5

analyses and discusses compositional processes with stylistic, historical, cultural and musical considerations

Music 2 P7

observes and discusses in detail the concepts of music in works representative of the mandatory and additional topics

Music 2 P11

demonstrates a willingness to participate in performance, composition, musicology and aural activities

Music 2 H2

demonstrates an understanding of the relationships between combinations of the concepts of music, by interpreting, notating, analysing, discussing, composing and evaluating combinations of musical symbols reflecting those characteristically used in the mandatory and additional topics

Music 2 H5

demonstrates a developing confidence and willingness to engage in performing, composing and listening experiences

Music 2 H11

demonstrates a willingness to participate in performance, composition, musicology and aural activities

Activities

Activity 1

Learning intention

Students identify the relationship between the vocals and drum part and identify the type of drum being played.

Success criteria

Students move when they recognise rhythmic unison in vocals and drums; students follow the score and comment on the mimicry between voice and drum; students identify the type of taiko drum.

Syllabus outcomes

  • 4.7, 4.8, 4.9
  • 5.7, 5.8, 5.9
  • Music 1: P4, P6, P10, H10
  • Music 2: P3, P5, H5

Resources

Listening activity

Watch the introduction of 'Become' (41:00-43:25)

  • Students make an action when they hear the vocals and okedo-daiko play the rhythm together, in unison. (Hint: it occurs at 41:44)
  • Students follow the okedo-daiko score and listen to how the taiko aurally mimics the percussive vocalise.
  • Looking at the information under “About okedo-daiko”, name the specific type of okedo-daiko used in the performance of 'Become'. (Hint: despite the fact that the okedo is placed on the floor and not strapped over the shoulder, it is the katsugi-okedo)

Activity 2

Learning intention

Students research and experiment with French rhythm names applied to Taikoz rhythms and score.

Success criteria

Students understand the connection between French rhythm names and written Taikoz rhythms

Syllabus outcomes

  • 4.9, 4.12
  • 5.9, 5.12
  • Music 1: P2, H2
  • Music 2: P2, P5, P7, H2, H5

Resources

Research activity

Students can research and use French time names, which are commonly used in teaching music in European and Australian music schools. Here is an example of a short rhythm and accompanying French time names, as well as taiko kuchi shoga (Japanese vocal sounds), followed by an example of the same rhythm with an accompanying ‘rhythm poem’.

Activity 3

Learning intention

Students research and experiment with French rhythm names applied to Taikoz rhythms and score.

Success criteria

Students understand the connection between French rhythm names and written Taikoz rhythms

Syllabus outcomes

  • 4.9, 4.12
  • 5.9, 5.12
  • Music 1: P2, H2
  • Music 2: P2, P5, P7, H2, H5

Resources

Activity

Students learn and perform Ian’s piece Play The Taiko Taiko!, which uses a range of percussion instruments and percussive vocalise. See attached score: Play The Taiko Taiko! and accompanying reference MP3, Become (Play The Taiko Taiko! Vocalise & Percussion Piece audio)

  • Instrumentation can be changed, varied, added, subtracted, or otherwise adapted to suit the needs and resources of the students and teacher.
  • The tempo can be slowed down or increased, as required.
  • Please be aware that the MP3 is a synthesised version of the piece (i.e. it is not performed by live performers), and so the sounds and musical expression are inferior to a live performance.
  • On the MP3 audio file, the vocal parts are rendered by two high drum sounds, which will assist in learning the rhythm of the spoken text.

Followup activity

Students can change the name of the instrument in the text to another. This instrument can also be incorporated into the performance of the piece.

Activity 4

Learning intention

Students compose a short rhythm and add vocal sounds.

Success criteria

Students create an interesting rhythm with matching vocal syllables and lyrics.

Syllabus outcomes

  • 4.4
  • 5.4
  • Music 1: P3 H3
  • Music 2: P4 H4

Activity

Students compose a short rhythm and then make up vocal sounds (syllables) to imitate the sound of the rhythm. Students can also compose a poem to match the rhythm. Divide students into two groups – one to play the rhythm on instruments of their choosing (including body percussion) and the other to recite the vocal sounds (or poem).

Attachments

Attachment 1: 'Become' composer notes

Composed by Anton Lock

What was the inspiration behind the composition of 'Become'?

'Become' was originally part of a larger work that was loosely composed for taiko, electric guitars, drum set, and electronic sounds. The part that Taikoz performs in The Beauty Of 8 was always intended as the ‘dance’ part. It was inspired by the thought of "becoming the other side of you". The idea that everyone has ‘two sides’ is fascinating to me – by challenging yourself, undertaking a difficult task, or putting yourself in extreme situations you can access or ‘become’ that other side.

What inspired the choreography?

The choreography was largely inspired by the Onikenbai dance of Iwate Prefecture in Japan. It is a traditional art form of that I have loved and studied for many years. However, I did not want to copy the dance exactly so I experimented a lot, came up with new choreography, and adapted what I believe to be the same language as Onikenbai but with my own ‘twist’.

What role does Chieko Kojima play in 'Become'?

I really like the combination of the female energy (Chieko) with the male energy (3 male dancers). Cheiko's character has what the male dancers ‘crave’ – through their desire for that ‘thing’, she is able to ‘control’ them... I think the idea of desire and what you are capable of doing for that desire is fitting with the theme of ‘becoming’ something.

Vocal percussion is used very effectively – why did you choose to use this technique and sound for the opening passages?

As taiko players we always learn rhythms and melodies firstly by singing. I wanted to use that idea to show people how we sing and how that translates onto the taiko, yet I also wanted to show the entire progression by starting from the breath, to the singing, to the taiko, and finally to the dance, which subsequently demonstrates the motif of ‘becoming something’ through the structure of the piece.

Attachment 2: The okedo-daiko score of the introduction to 'Become'

* bachi is the Japanese word for drumstick and take is the Japanese word for bamboo (i.e. bamboo drumstick)

Attachment 3: Example of 'percusive vocalise' in the introduction to 'Become'

Attachment 4: Example of taiko kuchi shoga in the introduction to 'Become'

Attachment 5: Example showing French names, taiko kuchi shoga and 'rhythm poem'

Attachment 6: 'Play the Taiko Taiko' score

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